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The Cooking Channel’s Alie & Georgia Share How to Spice Up a Party

The Cooking Channel’s Alie & Georgia Share How to Spice Up a Party

Quick tips and small bites can help you host a party with ‘gusto’

Georgia & Alie used the NESCAFÉ® Dolce Gusto®! machine to make espresso for a few of their recipes.

Even though it’s only August and we’re all still desperately clinging on to what remains of summer, the holidays will sneak up on us before we know it. Nescafe Dolce Gusto partnered with Alie & Georgia, hosts of Cooking Channel’s Tripping Out with Alie & Georgia and Classy Ladies, to host a holiday entertaining event where they shared tips and hacks that make party planning much more manageable, as well as some of the delicious food they make for their own parties.

They girls travel a good amount and we were privy to their experience on how to make some delicious food that’s easy to eat and share, as well as how to save time and keep guests entertained. We got to sample some of Alie & Georgia’s favorite flavor combos that they picked up from their escapades in smaller bites, like their meatballs stuffed with bacon, medjool dates, and blue cheese that were a bite-sized take on a burger they had on the road. The appetizer of lobster napoleon was an interesting combination of crispy potato and fennel with light vinaigrette, and the filet of beef was perfectly marinated in brandy with hints of blackberry and juniper, paired with potato gratin and French beans. Their “Cuppa Cake,” a small chocolate espresso cake that’s baked in an espresso cup and topped with coffee liqueur-infused whipped cream, was a really interesting way to serve dessert in a smaller, more attractive way than how it’s typically seen.

They also whipped up a dessert drink that packed a punch, their “Dolce Gusto Amaro Amore” made with bourbon, Averna Amaro, and Nescafe Dolce Gusto’s espresso. The food was delicious, and getting to learn a few tips from the experts on how to adapt favorite dishes for a party format was really enlightening.


Alie & Georgia: Meet Your New BFF &mdash Rosemary

Alie Ward and Georgia Hardstark, a.k.a. Alie & Georgia, host Cooking Channel food-travel series Tripping Out with Alie & Georgia. Visit PEOPLE.com every Thursday for their playful spins on celebrity recipes, cocktails, entertaining ideas𠅊nd, of course, lots of laughs!

As cocktail connoisseurs and co-hostesses, we rub elbows with a lot of ingredients. Well not literally because that would be messy and gross. But we have quite a cadre of herbs we keep close to use as seasoning and garnish. But we have a secret. Don’t tell all the other herbs and spices — because a lot of them are delicate and would be crushed — but rosemary is the best.

Yep that hearty, shrubby evergreen bush right outside your door is our hands down favorite herb. Not only does it look cool in the yard (it can be shaped into Edward Scissorhands-ian topiaries!) but unlike a lot of fragile seasonal herbs, rosemary is up for fun all year round. So summer or winter, you can snip of a twig and have fresh flavor in soups, cocktails and even baked goods. In this cold weather, it’s the one herb that’s still standing and there to help keep things tasty when you’re in a pinch.

RELATED: Alie & Georgia: 3 Boozy Floats Perfect for the Holidays

Below our some of our favorite uses for rosemary. Seriously, get ready to start doodling ideas for rosemary tattoos, because you’re about to become obsessed.

Cooking

The first thing that comes to mind when you hear “rosemary” might be: HELLO, YES ITALIAN FOOD! It is, after all, a Mediterranean shrub. With its pine-like aroma, rosemary is a versatile player it can be finely chopped and added to butter to make a spread, or left whole and rested atop a fish before it’s baked. Rocco DiSpirito makes a great chicken dish with it and we love to toss a fresh sprig in soup stock as it simmers. And if you’re roasting any kind of root vegetables — especially potatoes — you had best invite some chopped rosemary to the party. She’s like the friend who hits the dance floor first and makes everything more fun.

Baking

Wait, what — you can bake with it? Of course! Finely chopped, rosemary adds such a great depth of flavor to lemon cakes, and Melissa d𠆚rabian even makes a chocolate chip shortbread with rosemary. Genius!
RELATED: Alie & Georgia: 3 Signature Cocktails for Your Thanksgiving Feast

Cocktails

Naturally, rosemary makes an insanely wonderful cocktail garnish. Because it’s so fragrant, a sprig of rosemary can balance out a sweet or tart drink and give it more earthy complexity. We love it with blackberry or citrus cocktails, and it pairs great with gin since the juniper in the spirit also has evergreen notes. (See our Golden Ratio cocktail formula and use rosemary as the herb. Trust us: You’ll love it.) Note: you can also very lightly singe the tips of a small sprig and toss it in a stirred drink — like an Old Fashioned or Manhattan — for a wonderfully smoky, wintry flavor.

Rosemary tea

Not a drinker? That’s fine. As we type this, there’s a warm steaming cup of rosemary tea next to the laptop. A small sprig (fresh or dried) steeped in boiling water for 5� minutes yields an easy, forest-y sipper that you can sweeten with honey or drink on its own. Bonus: The rosmarinic and caffeic acid have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and can help in digestion. Translation: It’s good for your skin and your belly.

Eye candy

Lastly, rosemary is great eye candy. It looks like a pine tree but smells even better, and if you have some shrubbery to prune, a few long stems make a great winter centerpiece. Also, shove a sprig or two on a cheese platter and everyone with think you’re Beyoncé. It looks that fancy.


Alie Ward and Georgia Hardstark: The queens of the cocktail get serious about drinking

If you’re not already proud to be an American, consider this: Cocktails were invented in the United States. Traditionally, a cocktail meant a spirit, a sugar and a bitter mixed in a glass. But as sure as the little states spread out into the vast expanse of the West, cocktails grew to include all manner of mixed alcoholic beverages. In the last decade, New York may have played a large part in the classic cocktail resurgence with the opening of Pegu Club and Death & Company. But out West, L.A. bartenders have perfected artisinal cocktails with year-round fresh produce and an experimental fearlessness.

Downtown, you can’t throw a lowball glass without hitting a bar that specializes in craft cocktails using fresh ingredients. (Also, you shouldn’t be throwing lowball glasses.) Westside’s got breezy beach pubs, and L.A.’s eastern enclaves are home to plenty of reliable dive bars. Hollywood does short skirts, high heels and velvet ropes better than any other town in the nation, and the Valley is the place to go if you need to sink into a drink in a lounge without running into any of your exes.

But the beauty of Los Angeles is found in the surprises waiting in every neighborhood: the opulent speakeasies in the grittier parts of town the laid-back elegance of Eveleigh in the middle of the Sunset Strip a serious, spirit-driven spot called Neat tucked away in Glendale. Los Angeles both embraces and defies its own typecasting, and that’s why we love it.


Alie & Georgia: The Golden Ratio Cocktail a.k.a. the Only Drink Recipe You'll Ever Need

Alie Ward and Georgia Hardstark, a.k.a. Alie & Georgia, host Cooking Channel food-travel series Tripping Out with Alie & Georgia. Visit PEOPLE.com every Thursday for their playful spins on celebrity recipes, cocktails, entertaining ideas𠅊nd, of course, lots of laughs!

𠇊lie and Georgia,” people ask us, “how do I make a cocktail at home that takes very little effort, is inexpensive but tastes like it costs $18 and I only need one recipe on hand for the rest of my life to make untold hundreds of different cocktail combinations for ever and all eternity with just a few simple ingredients?”

BOY HOWDY, DO WE HAVE AN ANSWER.

RELATED: Alie & Georgia: Don’t Be Intimidated by Elderflower Liqueur — Here’s How to Use It

We just came up with a Golden Ratio Cocktail that is maybe the only recipe you will ever need. Swap out the spirit add flavored bitters and garnish with a sprig of your favorite herb, if you want to get fancy.

But the backbone of this drink is the choice of fruit soda: go for a tangy orange, or an old school brand of cherry or even a fruit soda you make at home if you have a counter top carbonator. We also love IZZE’s line (Sparkling Blackberry goes with everything) or some of the Jarritos Mexican sodas at the local markets in Los Angeles.

Either way, shake the first three ingredients over ice, pour into a tall glass of ice and top with your choice of soda. You have a quick, easy, complex and expensive tasting drink with just the right amount of booze, bitters and sweetness. Boom!


More Stories

Jake Ilardi: Get to know the world-class street skateboarder

Dew Tour Des Moines kicked off at Lauridsen Skatepark this week, with the world’s top skaters in town for the Olympic qualifying event.

Jake Ilardi is coming into the Dew Tour with the momentum of a 2nd place finish at the USA Skateboarding Championships Men's Street Finals.

New COVID-19 cases plummet to lowest levels since last June

New coronavirus cases across the United States have tumbled to rates not seen in more than 11 months, sparking optimism that vaccination campaigns are stemming both severe COVID-19 cases and the spread of the virus.

As cases, hospitalizations and deaths steadily dropped this week, pre-pandemic life in America has largely resumed. Hugs and unmasked crowds returned to the White House, a Mardi Gras-style parade marched through Alabama’s port city of Mobile, and even states that have stuck to pandemic-related restrictions readied to drop them. However, health experts also cautioned that not enough Americans have been vaccinated to completely extinguish the virus, leaving the potential for new variants that could extend the pandemic.

Mariah Duran: USA’s top-ranked female street skateboarder

Dew Tour Des Moines kicked off at Lauridsen Skatepark this week, with the world's top skaters in town for the Olympic qualifying event.

Mariah Duran is a professional skateboarder from Albuquerque, New Mexico. The 24-year-old has been competing at the professional level since 2018 when she was signed to Meow Skateboards. Duran recently won the USA Skateboarding National Championships Women's Street division and is the USA's top-ranked female street skateboarder. Get to know more about Duran in the video above.


Multimedia

Hosting a holiday party is a great way to share the holiday spirit with friends and family. And no matter the size of the gathering, the Chex Go-To Guide For Holiday Party Magic has easy party planning tips to make the night a success. Some tips include

  • Throwing A Theme Party: &ldquoIf you&rsquore throwing a theme party, make sure to clearly explain on the invitation what the guests should bring or wear so that theme can shine through,&rdquo Courtney Whitmore, party planning blogger at Pizzazzerie.
  • Serving Festive Cocktails: &ldquoFestive holiday themed margaritas like a Mistletoe Marg can be a great addition to your holiday party. Just make sure you don&rsquot actually mix the margarita with mistletoe because mistletoe is poisonous.&rdquo Alie & Georgia, Food Network and Cooking Channel personalities.
  • Avoiding the Double Dip: &ldquoTry serving homemade Chex mix in little cupcake liners. They make for great individual servings.

For more holiday tips, tricks, and delicious Chex party mix, visit Chex.com.

Create Holiday Party Magic With The Help of @ChexCereal Go-To Holiday Guide #ChexMagic Tweet

About General Mills, Inc.
General Mills is one of the world&rsquos leading food companies, operating in more than 100 countries around the world. Its brands include Cheerios, Fiber One, Häagen-Dazs, Nature Valley, Yoplait, Betty Crocker, Pillsbury, Old El Paso, Wanchai Ferry, Yoki and more. Headquartered in Minneapolis, Minn., USA, General Mills had fiscal 2015 worldwide sales of US $18.8 billion.

Media contacts:
Hannah Miller
Fast Horse
[email protected]
(612) 695-7864

Mike Siemienas
General Mills
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(763) 764-6364


18 can't-get-enough Southern recipes for collards, kale and every green in between

While we may be knee deep in squash recipes this week, there's still room for one of our other fall favorites — braised hearty greens. From collards to kale and even turnip and mustard, there's a Southern-grown green for you.

Read on for 18 savory, tangy, meaty and even vegetarian recipes using hearty greens.

Sweet and Spicy Collard Greens
When you think of the flavor profile of classic collard greens, this recipe checks all the delicious boxes. Ham hocks bring smokiness to the party, while the jalapenos and hot sauce offer the spice that most collard lovers crave. Since the best collards also boast a balancing act of sweet and tangy, using twice as much vinegar as brown sugar keeps the acidity in check while not allowing them to become too cloying. Be sure to cook the greens at a steady simmer to prevent them from shriveling up and not absorbing the pot liquor.
Get the recipe

Instant Pot Collard Greens
Better living through technology. If you’re a member of the legion of Instant Pot fanatics — or perhaps you’re new to the IP game — this is an ideal recipe for the versatile gadget. Originally designed for a pressure cooker, these collard greens only require 20 minutes of cooking under pressure to become so tender, you’d think they’ve simmered for hours. Cooking the bacon separately ensures it gets crisp before being introduced to the greens.
Get the recipe

Bourbon Collard Greens
Typically, collard greens feature apple cider vinegar, but this particular recipe opts for the more robust balsamic vinegar, which has a more mellow acidic bite. The real star of the show is the bourbon, which provides a sweet backdrop that plays beautifully with the salty, smoky bacon. We love the textural contrast between the hardy collards and the delicate spinach, as well.
Get the recipe

Eddie's Turnip Greens
Collards seem to get more press, but turnip greens can be equally delicious. Softer and less bitter than their seemingly more famous cousins, these tender greens absorb flavor in a similar fashion while requiring less cooking time. Try this recipe from Eddie Hernandez, chef and owner of Atlanta’s Taqueria del Sol, which eats slightly more like a soup than simply straight greens. The butter and tomatoes harmonize nicely with the turnip greens to create a dish that just begs to be served alongside some rice and pinto beans. (Hint: If you visit Taqueria del Sol, this is an off-menu creation known as “The George.”)
Get the recipe

One-Pot Early Fall Minestrone
This veggie-packed soup makes a deliciously healthy and satisfying one-pot dinner. Featuring zucchini and Swiss chard, it’s perfect for enjoying at the first sign of fall. A Parmesan rind adds rich umami flavor — don’t skip it!
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Virginia Willis' Smoky Vegan Collard Greens
Vegans and vegetarians need culinary love too, and Virginia Willis offers a delicious, meatless alternative by using canned chipotle peppers to mimic the smokiness of bacon, ham hocks or turkey. There is also no sugar nor vinegar, as tomato juice covers both bases of sweetness and acidity, helping the greens tenderize as they cook. For other meat-free methods, try cooking your collards in garlic butter with a touch of water or by substituting umami-rich white miso paste for any cured pork a recipe may require.
Get the recipe

Collard Green Pesto
We like to make pesto sauces using just about any green or herb we can get our hands on, and this collard green-filled twist is no exception. Serve collard green pesto as a dipping sauce — we love it with the pictured Hoppin' John fritters — or toss it with al dente pasta for an ultra quick Southern dinner.
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Cynthia Graubart's Apple Kale Coleslaw
When it comes time to plan recipes for potlucks and game day parties, leave the tubs of watery, bland coleslaw and dull potato salad in the cold case at the supermarket and try this crisp, healthy apple and kale slaw from chef Cynthia Graubart. Our friend Virginia Willis adapted the recipe for Southern Kitchen.
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Cast Iron Chicken Under a Brick with Kale
While pork may be a traditional accompaniment to braised or sauteed greens, we think that kale really shines when it is paired with chicken — and its schmaltzy fat. Here, we've cooked it super simply in rendered chicken fat with a hefty serving of garlic and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.
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Fall Harvest Salad with Kale
Kale salad isn't just for Californians. In this recipe, we pair thinly sliced Tuscan kale with some super-Southern friends — toasted pecans, diced mirlitons, apples and roasted butternut squash — for a salad substantial enough to eat for dinner all on its own.
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Southern Vegetable Soup
Hearty greens also make a great supporting player in soups and stews. Pair a duo of cabbage and collards with black eyed peas, tomatoes and carrots and you'll end up with a simple, but super flavorful, Southern vegetable soup chock full of nutrients. Eat this the day after a fried chicken dinner.
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Virginia Willis' West African Chicken Stew with Collards and Peanuts
Flavor bomb alert! This stew has it all: heat from the habanero chile, sweetness and richness from peanut butter, headiness from spices and that classic bitterness from the greens. Let them simmer together and you have a stew that captures so much of the culinary traditions of the American South by honoring the roots of the ingredients and techniques.
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Butternut Squash and Kale Casserole
Comfort food is at its best in this simple, cheesy casserole. The deep green kale mixed with the bright orange hue of the squash coincides with the changing leaves. You can use any variety of squash you like and any preferred nutty cheese. Serve this casserole warm alongside your Thanksgiving feast or at your next dinner party.
Get the recipe

Photos (Instant Pot collards, bourbon collard greens, collard green pesto, fall harvest salad): Ramona King
Photos (Eddie's turnip greens, cast iron chicken and kale): Kate Williams
Photo (minestrone): Julie Koppman
Photos (vegan collards, kale and apple slaw): Virginia Willis
Photo (vegetable soup): Ryan Hughley
Photo (peanut stew): Angie Mosier
Photo (kale casserole): Catherine Baker

Chef Jeffrey Gardner is a native of Natchez, Miss., and a graduate of Millsaps College and Johnson & Wales University. He lives in Atlanta and has served as sous chef for popular restaurants South City Kitchen Midtown and Alma Cocina. In 2013 he became executive chef for East Cobb restaurant Common Quarter and was named one of ten &ldquoNext Generation of Chefs to Watch&rdquo by the Atlanta Business Chronicle. He has appeared on TV shows including Food Network&rsquos Chopped and Cooking Channel&rsquos How to Live to 100, and also filmed a series of healthy cooking videos with retired pro wrestler and fitness guru Diamond Dallas Page. In his spare time, he enjoys traveling the world with his wife Wendy, watching game shows and &ldquospending all his money on Bruce Springsteen concerts.&rdquo

Kate Williams is the former editor-in-chief of Southern Kitchen. She was also the on-air personality on our podcast, Sunday Supper. She's worked in food since 2009, including a two-year stint at America&rsquos Test Kitchen. Kate has been a personal chef, recipe developer, the food editor at a hyperlocal news site in Berkeley and a freelance writer for publications such as Serious Eats, Anova Culinary, The Cook&rsquos Cook and Berkeleyside. Kate is also an avid rock climber and occasionally dabbles in long-distance running. She makes a mean peach pie and likes her bourbon neat.


Cumberland Island, Georgia

Reachable only by ferry or kayak, with a limit of no more than 300 visitors per day and only 1 small inn, Cumberland Island maintains its reputation as one of America's most pristine seaside regions. The island's 17 miles of windswept white beaches and sand dunes remain pure and untouched except for the wild horses and loggerhead turtles that call these shores home. 

Visitors to the beaches will not find watersports or other activities, but rather, can enjoy the quiet wonders of nature. Folks itching to explore beyond the sandy shores can indulge in a hike throughout the island's wilderness. 

Cumberland Island is truly a nature lover's dream. It boasts 3 ecosystems, including beaches, marshes and forests as well as a rich variety of animals and plants. Towering oaks draped with Spanish moss line the trails of the forest, which is a habitat for armadillos, deer, hogs, rabbits, turkeys, raccoons and horses. The island's marshes and estuaries are inhabited with fish, ducks and crabs, and its sky is filled with birds like egrets and wood storks.

As incredible as the rich wilderness that lies at vistors' fingertips is the island's history. Seven Native American villages once thrived on the island, and it was settled by both Spanish and English explorers. The island was eventually bought by the Carnegie family in the 1880s and remains of their wealth, now the ruins of mansions, dot the island.

Accommodations

Best Island Inn
Greyfield Inn
Web site: www.greyfieldinn.com
Time appears to have stopped in the loveliest of ways at this majestic mansion by the sea, which was built in 1900 as a home for Lucy and Thomas Carnegie's daughter, Margaret Ricketson. Tucked into a tangle of island wilderness, Greyfield Inn - the only accommodation on the island - pampers guests with an array of amenities included in room rates, such as ferry transportation to the island breakfast, picnic lunches and gourmet dinners cocktail hours island tours bicycle rentals, and the use of sports and beach equipment. The inn's charm lies in its timelessness: wild horses frolic in the front yard, grass-covered sand dunes are within arm's reach, and rooms are uniquely decorated with antique heirlooms.

Best Backcountry Camping
Stafford Beach
If spending a night under the stars adjacent to one of America's most pristine beaches - where you're kept company by whinnying feral horses - sounds like a backcountry dream (or if a night's rates at the island's one inn are too steep), consider a camping adventure at Stafford Beach Campground. Because no more than 60 people are allowed overnight at the island's campsites, campers are guaranteed seclusion and a true bonding experience with the elements. Stafford Beach is a 3-mile hike from the ferry dock and has no designated campsites campers are allowed to set up tents within 50 yards of the camp sign.

Best Bed-and-Breakfast
Spencer House Inn
Web site: www.spencerhouseinn.com
Exuding charm from every historic nook and cranny, this award-winning bed-and-breakfast stands as a testament to Victorian-era architecture and decor. Located in St. Mary's, just steps from the ferry to Cumberland Island, Spencer House was built by a sea captain in 1872 and is now operated by Mary and Mike Neff. Fresh flowers, chocolates and luxurious bath items greet guests when they arrive in their room, many of which feature clawfoot tubs, 4-poster beds and hardwood floors. Breakfast includes fresh fruit, eggs, pancakes, French toast and homemade cakes freshly packed picnic lunches are available upon request.

Best Family/Budget Accommodation
Cumberland Kings Bay Lodges
Web site: www.cumberlandkbl.com
Folks looking for amusement parks, Jet Skis or other types of high-octane family fun will be hard-pressed to find it in quiet St. Mary's or the remote wilds of Cumberland Island. Still, families need not despair - thanks to Cumberland Kings Bay Lodge, there's still a place that considers kids' and families' needs. Rooms are nicely, if simply, furnished, and all feature TV with cable and kitchenettes. But the best part? A large swimming pool and gazebo, a playground with jungle gyms, and a picnic area and grills perfect for an evening barbecue.

Food & Drink

Best Fine Dining
Greyfield Inn
Web site: www.greyfieldinn.com
Guests staying at the elegant Greyfield Inn are privy to exquisitely prepared meals in a magnificent, candlelit dining room. The inn's dining traditions are as gracious and timeless as the inn itself: A dinner bell calls guests to their meal, and men are required to wear jackets. The inn boasts having the sole restaurant on the island, but it is only for the Greyfield's guests. Meals vary with the season, but include a delicate seared tuna steak with tequila-citrus pineapple marinade and marinated tenderloin with sweet balsamic reduction. But the highlight is dessert, which can feature a sumptuous Godiva-chocolate-and-Butterfinger cheesecake.

Best Casual Fare
Dick's Wings and Grill
Web site: www.dickswingsandgrill.com
After a long day hiking in the island wilderness, spice things up with some sizzlin' wings when you return to the mainland. Dick's Wings and Grill serves up 365 flavors of wings - 1 for every day of the year - with original tantalizing tastes like bourbon, flying fajita, smokey mountain and raspberry. Besides standard Buffalo-style, these wings can be served breaded, blackened or grilled. If wings don't cut it, Dick's also offers plenty of burgers, chicken sandwiches, wrap sandwiches and a kiddie menu.

Best Waterfront Dining
Lang's Marina Restaurant
The true flavor of Georgia's coastal isles, known as the "golden isles," and nearby coastal towns can be found on the waterfront, where fishing rigs and trawlers dock. In St. Mary's visitors can overlook the waterfront while enjoying fresh seafood at Lang's Marina Restaurant, a local dining staple. The restaurant's popularity stems from its variety of shrimp dishes - a selection wide enough to make even Forrest Gump's shrimp-loving friend, Bubba, proud. Freshly caught with the restaurant's own boats, the tasty crustaceans are served up by Lang's cooks in shrimp bisque, pick 'n' peel shrimp, rock shrimp, shrimp salad and shrimp po' boys, to name just a few.

Best Evening Entertainment
Trolley's Food and Spirits
The second-story facade of Trolley's restaurant just asks for folks to have a good time: The al fresco wooden verandah, green-and-white wooden overhang and tables can be reached via spiral staircase. It's no surprise that as evening falls, the deck fills up with folks looking to have fun. After a meal of steaks or seafood, patrons - often locally stationed sailors and Marines - grab some ice cold brews and sing their hearts out.


Food Network's New Competition Series 'Kitchen Casino'

Episode Description:
Four chefs enter the Kitchen Casino arena prepared to battle for the chance to win the jackpot. In the first round they gamble on the slot machine to determine the parameters for their dish. It proves to be a difficult round when one chef refuses to share a required ingredient. In round two there are high stakes with flank steaks when a chef goes bust after the roulette wheel is just too much to handle. Chips are stacked high in the final round of poker and the chef with the best strategy for incorporating salami, rutabaga, and fruit punch gets a chance to win $30,000 at the winner’s wheel.
Guest Judges: Michael Chernow, Kristin Sollenne


About Kitchen Casino

Food Network's new competition series Kitchen Casino hosted by Bill Rancic brings together four talented chefs in a high-stakes game of chance that requires skill, speed and adaptability. In each episode, four competitors would be wise to keep one eye on the ticking clock while they attempt to out-cook and out-smart their competition during three casino-themed cooking challenges - slots, poker and roulette - for a chance to win the $30,000 jackpot. The chefs must be at the top of their game throughout the three rounds to handle whatever Lady Luck deals them, and they must double-down on their skills or risk being 86'd. Each episode features a panel of rotating judges including Michael Chernow, Madison Cowan, Danyelle Freedman, Gavin Kaysen, Aliya Leekong and Kristin Sollenne.

About Bill Rancic
Bill Rancic originally burst onto the public scene as the first-ever winner of NBC's The Apprentice. Ten years later, this successful entrepreneur wears many hats as a television producer, best-selling author, television personality and restaurateur of the popular restaurant RPM-Italian chain. Rancic is co-executive producer and star with his wife Giuliana Rancic on their reality show, Guiliana & Bill. He also co-hosts the successful nationally syndicated television show, America Now, which recently celebrated its 500th episode and is currently in its fourth season. Rancic is the author of New York Times bestsellers You're Hired: How to Succeed in Business and Life and Beyond The Lemonade Stand. Rancic and wife Giuliana co-authored the best-seller I Do. Now What?, in which the couple share their secrets to everlasting love and understanding.


Cooking

I'm old, reddit, old. I know I don't look it, but I am beginning to feel it in my heart-of-hearts. This many years was far too long to live without discovering morels. Why didn't someone tell me? Actually someone did, my mother-in-law, but I passed it off as an old country memory of the Midwest in her youth. I didn't listen. I should have listened.

My local upscale grocery had a passel of morels so I decided Iɽ see if they were worth all the hype.

Oh my effing golly, we were dying they were so good. So good. No, you don't understand. They were so good. They FAR surpassed my expectations.

What a glorious thing to discover a new amazing food this late in your life. I am both feeling blessed and angry that I didn't know earlier.

Not sure I can go shroom picking roun these here parts (Texas), but I am off to discover where else (and for how long) I can get fresh morels.

100+ Charts, Graphs, and Data Visualizations -- All Designed in Figma

Opening a Norwegian restaurant

Ok so first off, I’m not sure if this post is allowed but I didn’t really know where else to ask. So I am Norwegian, living in America. I really want to open a restaurant that has a menu made up of Norwegian foods, but I’m worried that people might not be intrigued by the thought of eating there because most people don’t know much about the food. Do you all think that the restaurant could be successful?

Need to put on some pounds

I lost a ton of weight when I got sick, and after about 2 months of just green smoothies so I could keep something down, we found out it was my gallbladder.

Im feeling great now, but it’s like a switch flipped in my body. I used to be 155 lbs at 5’10” unable to slim down, and now I’m 115 on an average day and I can’t seem to get above that anymore. I have all my old eating habits back but it’s like my biology changed. I still have a sensitive stomach though and hate over eating, even before the loss. What can I do to pump up these numbers? Im happy I’m slimmer, but it’s summer and I’m giving off spooky skeleton vibes.

Edit: You’re all amazing :) thank you so much! I’ll try everything I can!

YSK: Growing herb plants can massively improve your cooking from home and can be grown anywhere with your own outdoor space for very little cost

Last year I started grown my own herbs. I'm personally against home gardening because it requires quite a bit of work and not to mention land. However, I discovered that when I planted herb plants in small to medium pots they flourished. My first year I bought some starters that were halfway grown of basil, thyme, rosemary, mint, chives, sage, and parsley. They took up minimal space and could easily be stored on an apartment deck. The only care they required was once a day watering and didn't even have to weed them.

Every single dish that you use fresh herbs instead of dried herbs gets a tremendous boost of flavor. I don't know if they actually saved on costs because I find that when they're out of season, I just don't use them. But mine were harvestable from May to well into October. My sage, thyme, and rosemary also came back this year after being left outside for the winter (we have a pretty mild winter). Below I'll list some of my uses so you can get an idea of what I'm talking about.

Basil: Pesto, any pasta dish with red sauce, thai basil pork (non thai basil still works even though it's not quite the same), (Bonus picture of how big my basil plants got. I made so much pesto.)

Thyme: Chicken stocks, chicken dishes, steak flavorings, adding to curing, most American style soups

Rosemary: See the list for thyme. Also, a gin and tonic with a sprig of rosemary brings it from being an at home drink to a $10 restaurant cocktail

Mint: Wonderful just making mint tea with hot water, some salads work really well with mint

Chives: As a garnish on most savory dishes, eggs, chicken salad, ranch

Sage: Chicken stock, pickling things, brown butter sage dishes, in cocktails

Parsley: Pesto, pasta aglio e olio, stocks, great with many savory dishes