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Where to Eat If You Want to Be President Slideshow

Where to Eat If You Want to Be President Slideshow

The must-stop spots for politicians on the campaign trail to the White House

Tilt'n Diner, Tilton, N.H.

The Tilt'n Diner is a hot spot for candidates campaigning in the Northeast. In fact, on their web site they state: "Tilt'n Diner opened in 1992, and has been called a 'must stop' on the New Hampshire Presidential Primary campaign trail by The Associated Press." Rick Santorum made an extremely publicized stop there in January.

Baby Boomers, Des Moines, Iowa

Then Senator Barack Obama made Baby Boomers, a cookie joint in Iowa, famous on his first presidential campaign by confirming their cookies as his favorite. This past April, President Obama requested some on a campaign stop in Iowa in April, despite the fact that the bakery was closing down a week later. That's dedication.

Hamburg Inn, Iowa City, Iowa

Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann, and Rick Santorum all made visits to the Hamburg Inn during the Iowa caucuses this year. In past races, Ronald Regan, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and even fictional president Josiah Bartlet (played by Martin Sheen on The West Wing) have all made stops at this popular burger joint in Iowa.

Mary Ann's Diner, Derry, N.H.

Mitt Romney and several other GOP candidates have stopped into this 1950s-style diner in New Hampshire during this campaign cycle. The owner is an independent and says that he is open to hosting candidates from both parties. They'll be chowing down on the state's Best Breakfast, as awarded by The New Hampshire Magazine in 2003.

Beacon Drive-In, Spartanburg, S.C.

This 400-seater is a must-visit for candidates from both parties. Michele Bachmann made the stop this year with bells on, as she danced to Elvis in the parking lot with an elderly customer and breezed away with a "chili cheeseburger-a-plenty" to go.

Ben's Chili Bowl, Washington, D.C.

Barack Obama gave the already iconic Ben's Chili Bowl in D.C. a publicity boost when he showed up there for a chili dog in 2008. It continues to draw political figures such as former French President Nicolas Sarkozy.

Versailles Restaurant, Miami

Every politician courting votes in Florida has to make the obligatory stop at the Miami-based Versailles Diner. Mitt Romney and John McCain both stopped in to campaign and enjoy an authentic Cuban meal, and former President Bill Clinton ate here a number of times.

Charlie Parker's Diner, Springfield, Ill.

Mitt Romney visited this Springfield, Ill., diner for pancakes and omelettes during a campaign stop in March. While there, Romney told a joke, comparing Charlie's Famous Giant Pancake, to the Puerto Rico primary results: "These pancakes are about as large as my win in Puerto Rico last night, I must admit," Romney said. "The margin is just about as good."

Tommy's Country Ham House, Greenville, S.C.

Tommy's is a de rigueur stop for candidates on the trail in South Carolina. The Greenville restaurant made headlines this year when both Romney and Gingrich's campaigns booked events for the same time on the same day. Although a Ham House showdown was avoided by some creative rescheduling, both candidates cracked jokes at their rescheduled appearances. "Callista and I are thrilled to be here, but I have a question — where's Mitt?" Gingrich joked. "I thought he was going to stay and maybe we'd have a little debate here this morning. So I'm kind of confused."

Pizza Ranch, Hull, IA

Ames.Patch.com says that there have been more than 35 visits by Republican candidates this year to Pizza Ranch restaurants in Iowa. The sudden popularity is explained by Dennis Goldford, a political science professor at Drake University. "It's a very convenient location where, presumably, the people who go there know what Pizza Ranch is about. It's a good place to find like-minded people who are open to this kind of message." He's referring to the chain's web site language, where they state their vision is "to glorify God by positively impacting the world we live in."

Wings Plus, Coral Springs, Fla.

According to The Sun Sentinel, former President George W. Bush put Wings Plus on the political campaign map in Florida by campaigning there for re-election in 2004. This campaign season, Wings Plus has hosted rallies for Herman Cain, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich.

Comma Coffee, Carson City, Nev.

Comma Coffee is a relatively new kid on the block to political campaign stops, but since they opened their doors in 2000, they have hosted Hillary Clinton, President Barack Obama, Joe Biden, Dennis Kucinich, Ron Paul, and even former President Jimmy Carter.

Lizard's Thicket, Columbia, S.C.

Perry and Santorum both enjoyed some down-home Southern cooking at this South Carolina joint. The restaurant has hosted rallies for half the GOP candidates this year and was Hillary Clinton's restaurant of choice during her 2008 campaign for president in Columbia.

The Machine Shed, Rockford, Ill.

Famous for its chocolate-covered bacon and Krispy Kreme cheeseburger, The Machine Shed in Rockford, Ill., has been visited by Mitt Romney and Rick Perry this year.

Wells Blue Bunny Ice Cream, Le Mars, IA

Josh Haner, a staff photographer for The New York Times who covered the GOP races in Iowa, shared in this article with NY Times blogger James Estrin that Wells Blue Bunny Ice Cream in Le Mars, Iowa, is a must-visit for candidates racing through the state.


"This is sweet simplicity at it's best. There are no overpowering flavors in this, just good comfort food. One of my favorite types of recipes! The only change I made , was using a red pepper instead of green , personal preference of the household. Baked in the time stated and came out perfect. The photo I took is next day , cold out of the fridge. There is NO WAY I could get a good 'hot' shot! LOL Great simple recipe , thanks so much for sharing! Made for fall PAC '08"


1. Winter White Chili

For a change of taste, try white chili instead of the traditional version. This lovely adaptation has a hint of both sweetness and spiciness. Unsweetened apple juice and cinnamon provide sweet notes, while jalapeno pepper provides the spicy kick. There's no chili powder here, which is why it's not red. Pair a cup of it with salad for a delightful and balanced lunch or dinner, or serve a bowlful for an entire meal when you don't want to mess with sides. You can make the chili in advance and reheat. And if you like, top with shrimp instead of cheese. CALORIES PER SERVING: 333

For a change of taste, try white chili instead of the traditional version. This lovely adaptation has a hint of both sweetness and spiciness. Unsweetened apple juice and cinnamon provide sweet notes, while jalapeno pepper provides the spicy kick. There's no chili powder here, which is why it's not red. Pair a cup of it with salad for a delightful and balanced lunch or dinner, or serve a bowlful for an entire meal when you don't want to mess with sides. You can make the chili in advance and reheat. And if you like, top with shrimp instead of cheese. CALORIES PER SERVING: 333


Mushrooms take the place of the traditional cured pork in this super-satisfying vegetarian carbonara recipe.

The almond oil in this recipe is so easy to make and also perfect for salad dressings.

Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

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Choose Iron-Rich Foods

According to experts, it's quite common for female athletes (yup, even the pros) to be deficient in iron, which could slow you down and increase your risk of injury in any sport. So be sure to include plenty of iron-packed products, such as oatmeal, fortified cereals, red meat, and spinach, into your athlete diet, says sports nutritionist Dawn Scott, a fitness coach for the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team. (Related: 5 Weird Signs You Could Have a Nutritional Deficiency)


30 Keto Dessert Recipes Because Life Sucks Without Sweets

The keto diet is no joke when it comes to limiting your carb intake&mdashwhich is why desserts can get pretty tricky. Most typical sweets are a no-go in high amounts (a big bowl of ice cream is out, even though you can have dairy). And forget about delicious pastries (still miss u, carbs). Even some fruits are off the table. Luckily, there are some loopholes out there. That's why we scoured the internet to find the best dessert recipes that will allow you to have your (keto-friendly) cake and eat it, too.

&ldquoHaving dessert on keto is like on any diet: Be conscientious about your carbs and calories and don&rsquot go crazy,&rdquo says Sarah Jadin, RD, of Keto Consulting. Hey, one surprising side effect of going keto is that you may not want dessert as often as you think. After your taste buds change on keto, sweets may taste extremely sweet, adds Jadin.

So what can you eat on the keto diet to satisfy your sweet tooth? Still a bunch of stuff, actually (think: peanut butter, dark chocolate or cacao, and coconut). You&rsquoll trade grain flours for nut flours like hazelnut, almond, and coconut, Jadin says. Rather than table sugar or honey, you&rsquoll opt for a sugar sub like Stevia or monk fruit.

These 30 keto desserts are so delicious, even your non-keto-abiding friends will be asking for the recipes.


21 Tempeh Recipes That Give Tofu a Run for Its Money

I'm a big fan of really good tempeh recipes, which are underrated and often overlooked in favor of recipes using tempeh's cousin: tofu.

Tempeh is made with fermented whole soybeans (and sometimes other beans or grains, like barley and rice), so it has a nutty flavor and dense, seedy texture—unlike tofu, which is made from soy milk curds and therefore has a softer, more delicate taste and feel. Because tempeh has a more complex texture and flavor profile than tofu, it is, in my opinion, much more delicious when done right.

Crumbled tempeh makes for a hearty ground-meat substitute—perfect for earthy vegetarian tacos, sloppy joes, or meatballs. For recipes for which you need the tempeh to be nice and tender, it needs a bit more TLC than the quick sauté you might give tofu.

I always buy tempeh when I'm at the grocery store, because it's relatively cheap where I shop and I love a good deal. There are 18 grams of protein in a standard serving (about three ounces), which is the minimum amount of protein many registered dietitians recommend getting at every meal. And even though I don't have any dietary restrictions, I'm always interested in eating less meat when I can, since it's better for the environment.

Most of the time, though, the tempeh winds up sitting in my fridge for ages, until I finally give up and throw it into a stir-fry a few days before it's set to expire. But honestly, the tempeh deserves better. If you want to change your tempeh ways too, these 21 recipes will help you do just that. They'll guide you through the proper cooking techniques, and help you turn the humble ingredient into croutons, chilis, vegetarian burgers, and more. Before you know it, you'll be a tempeh master.


Hair Loss Can Be Fought With These 7 Foods

Much like the rest of your body, your hair goes through changes as you get older. The hair cycle -- rest, shed and grow -- slow downs, and can lead to hair loss, which can be very traumatizing.

"Your hair changes every seven years," explains women's hair restoration expert Lucinda Ellery. "There are 150,000-200,000 hairs on our heads we actually shed 100 a day, 36,000 in a year on average. It regenerates at approximately the same rate, although a little bit less each trimester.

"By the time you're 15, it's the best head of hair you'll have for your entire life. (Editor's note: Wah!) By the time you're 30 there will be a significant change in your hair, but not one you may have clicked into mentally. By the time you're 37, 40, there's a marked changed. This is where people panic -- it's a natural cycle of aging."

"The causes are always the same," says Dr. Mickey Barber, president of Cenegics Carolinas, an age management institute. "The number one reason is stress, number two is iron deficiency and the number three is hormonal, which could be affected by menopause, perimenopause."

Instead of panicking at the strands of hair in your brush, Ellery recommends taking control of your body by eating healthier.

"It's really how healthy your body is. You start to notice more shine and elasticity, if you start treating your body from within.," Ellery told the Huffington Post. "if you have a way of finding out if your body is acidic, imbibe foods that would make it more alkaline: Fresh vegetables, fresh salads, fresh nutrients in our drinks and our foods. [Avoid] acid making foods like milk and dairy products, breads, and potatoes [because they] change the pH value of your body."

So what foods should you eat to help strengthen your hair and avoid hair loss? Take a look at the slideshow below.


1. Brussels sprouts and walnut pizza with whole wheat flax crust

You might not thing pizza would be among our list of the healthiest recipes, but there’s no need to feel guilty about eating it when you do it right. In this recipe, the crust is made using whole wheat flour and flax seed meal. If you don’t want to make your own crust, then purchase whole wheat dough from your local pizzeria or head to the market to purchase refrigerated or frozen whole wheat dough.

Skill level: Beginner
Yields: 2 (14-inch) pizzas
Start to Finish: 1 hour, 51 minutes, plus 1 hour for dough to rise
Prep: 25 minutes
Cook: 1 hour, 26 minutes

Ingredients:

For the crust
1 cup whole-wheat flour
2 cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoon instant yeast
1¼ cup warm water
1 tablespoon olive oil
1¼ teaspoon salt
¼ cup flax seed meal

For the toppings
1 shallot, minced
1 pound Brussels sprouts, quartered
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon garlic olive oil (1/2 tablespoon for each pizza)
1 cup walnuts, crushed and toasted
8 oz burrata (4 oz for each pizza)
Sea salt and fresh cracked black pepper to taste
1 tablespoon chestnut honey (or any high-quality honey- ½ tablespoon for each pizza)

Instructions:

1. Combine all ingredients except flax in a large bowl either by hand or using a mixer. Add the flax and knead mixture together until no longer sticky. Cover and let rise for 1 hour. Cut dough in half and separate to rise for another hour.
2. While rising, preheat oven to 450 degrees.
3. Roll the dough out onto a pizza stone until 14” in diameter. Bake on the lower rack for about 10 minutes, until the edges start to slightly brown. Remove from oven and arrange toppings. Repeat for second pizza.

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
2. On a baking sheet, toast the walnuts for approximately 8 minutes, until they begin to brown. In a medium to large roasting pan, toss together the olive oil, Brussels sprouts and shallot. Season with salt and pepper. Turn the oven up to 375 degrees and roast for 50 minutes, until Brussels sprouts are tender inside and crisp on the outside.
3. Brush 1/2 tablespoon garlic olive oil all over dough and add half of the Brussels sprouts, walnuts and burrata (save the rest for second pizza.) Bake for another 8 minutes or until cheese is melted and crust is slightly brown.
4. Remove from the oven and season with salt and pepper to taste. Drizzle honey over pizza and serve. Repeat for second pizza.

Recipe and photo by Kara Lydon, RD, LDN, RYT of The Foodie Dietitian.

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Eating To Break 100: Longevity Diet Tips From The Blue Zones

A distinct version of the Mediterranean diet is followed on the Blue Zone island of Ikaria, Greece. It emphasizes olive oil, vegetables, beans, fruit, moderate amounts of alcohol and low quantities of meat and dairy products. Gianluca Colla/Courtesy of Blue Zones hide caption

A distinct version of the Mediterranean diet is followed on the Blue Zone island of Ikaria, Greece. It emphasizes olive oil, vegetables, beans, fruit, moderate amounts of alcohol and low quantities of meat and dairy products.

Gianluca Colla/Courtesy of Blue Zones

Want to live to be 100? It's tempting to think that with enough omega-3s, kale and blueberries, you could eat your way there.

But one of the key takeaways from a new book on how to eat and live like "the world's healthiest people" is that longevity is not just about food.

The people who live in the Blue Zones — five regions in Europe, Latin America, Asia and the U.S. researchers have identified as having the highest concentrations of centenarians in the world — move their bodies a lot. They have social circles that reinforce healthy behaviors. They take time to de-stress. They're part of communities, often religious ones. And they're committed to their families.

The Salt

Eat Plants And Prosper: For Longevity, Go Easy On The Meat, Study Says

The Salt

Nuts For Longevity: Daily Handful Is Linked To Longer Life

But what they put in their mouths, how much and when is worth a close look, too. And that's why Dan Buettner, a National Geographic explorer and author who struck out on a quest in 2000 to find the lifestyle secrets to longevity, has written a follow up to his original book on the subject. The new book, called The Blue Zones Solution, is aimed at Americans, and is mostly about eating.

Why should we pay attention to what the people in the relatively isolated Blue Zone communities eat? Because, as Buettner writes, their more traditional diets harken back to an era before we Americans were inundated with greasy fast food and sugar. And to qualify as a Blue Zone, these communities also have to be largely free of afflictions like heart disease, obesity, cancer and diabetes. So clearly they're doing something right.

You can get the backstory in this excerpt of the original book, which was published in 2008. But in a nutshell, Buettner in 2004 rounded up a bunch of anthropologists, demographers, epidemiologists and other researchers to travel around the world to study communities with surprisingly high percentages of centenarians. He and the scientists interviewed hundreds of people who'd made it to age 100 about how they lived, then did a lot of number crunching to figure out what they had in common.

The Salt

For Mind And Body: Study Finds Mediterranean Diet Boosts Both

A year after that book was published, the team announced they'd narrowed it down to five places that met all their criteria. They gave them official Blue Zone status: Ikaria, Greece Okinawa, Japan Ogliastra Region, Sardinia Loma Linda, Calif. and Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica.

In the new book, which was released April 7, Buettner distills the researchers' findings on what all the Blue Zones share when it comes to their diet. Here's a taste:

  • Stop eating when your stomach is 80 percent full to avoid weight gain.
  • Eat the smallest meal of the day in the late afternoon or evening.
  • Eat mostly plants, especially beans. And eat meat rarely, in small portions of 3 to 4 ounces. Blue Zoners eat portions this size just five times a month, on average.
  • Drink alcohol moderately and regularly, i.e. 1-2 glasses a day.

The book also features "top longevity foods" from each Blue Zone, some of which we found pretty intriguing.

Ikaria, Greece

You may remember this Blue Zone from Buettner's wonderful 2012 New York Times Magazine article entitled "The Island Where People Forget To Die."

As we've reported, health researchers have long praised the Mediterranean diet for promoting brain and physical health and keeping chronic diseases at bay. So what makes the diet of the people on Ikaria, a small island in the Aegean Sea, so special?

"Their tradition of preparing the right foods, in the right way, I believe, has a lot to do with the island's longevity," writes Buettner.

And "what set it apart from other places in the region was its emphasis on potatoes, goat's milk, honey, legumes (especially garbanzo beans, black-eyed peas, and lentils), wild greens, some fruit and relatively small amounts of fish."

Ikaria has a few more "top longevity foods:" feta cheese, lemons and herbs like sage and marjoram that Ikarians use in their daily tea. What's missing that we usually associate with Greece? Lamb. The Ikarians do eat some goat meat, but not often.

Okinawa, Japan

Buettner calls the islands of Okinawa a kind of "Japanese Hawaii" for their laid-back vibe, beaches and fabulous weather. Okinawa also happens to have one of the highest centenarian ratios in the world: About 6.5 in 10,000 people live to 100 (compare that with 1.73 in 10,000 in the U.S.)

Centenarians on Okinawa have lived through a lot of upheaval, so their dietary stories are more complicated than some of the other Blue Zones. As Buettner writes, many healthful Okinawan "food traditions foundered mid-century" as Western influence brought about changes in food habits. After 1949, Okinawans began eating fewer healthful staples like seaweed, turmeric and sweet potato and more rice, milk and meat.

Still, Okinawans have nurtured the practice of eating something from the land and the sea every day. Among their "top longevity foods" are bitter melons, tofu, garlic, brown rice, green tea and shitake mushrooms.

Sardinia, Italy

On this beautiful island in the middle of the Mediterrean, the ratio of centenarian men to women is one to one. That's quite unusual, because in the rest of the world, it's five women to every one man who live that long.

The sharp pecorino cheese made from the milk of grass-fed sheep in Sardinia, has high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Gianluca Colla/Courtesy of Blue Zones hide caption

The sharp pecorino cheese made from the milk of grass-fed sheep in Sardinia, has high levels of omega-3 fatty acids.

Gianluca Colla/Courtesy of Blue Zones

Buettner writes that the Sardinians explain their exceptional longevity with their assets such as "clean air," "locally produced wine," or because they "make love every Sunday." But when Buettner brought along a researcher to dig deeper, they found that pastoralism, or shepherding livestock from the mountains to the plains, was most highly correlated with reaching 100.

So what are those ancient Sardinian shepherds eating? You guessed it: goat's milk and sheep's cheese — some 15 pounds of cheese per year, on average. Also, a moderate amount of carbs to go with it, like flat bread, sourdough bread and barley. And to balance those two food groups out, Sardinian centenarians also eat plenty of fennel, fava beans, chickpeas, tomatoes, almonds, milk thistle tea and wine from Grenache grapes.

Loma Linda, Calif.

There's a Blue Zone community in the U.S.? We were as shocked to learn this as you may be. Its members are Seventh-day Adventists who shun smoking, drinking and dancing and avoid TV, movies and other media distractions.

Tofu links sold in Loma Linda, Calif. The Blue Zones research shows that adherents of the Adventist diet, which is mostly plant-based, have lowest rates of heart disease and diabetes in the U.S. and very low rates of obesity. David Mclain/Courtesy of Blue Zones hide caption

Tofu links sold in Loma Linda, Calif. The Blue Zones research shows that adherents of the Adventist diet, which is mostly plant-based, have lowest rates of heart disease and diabetes in the U.S. and very low rates of obesity.

David Mclain/Courtesy of Blue Zones

They also follow a "biblical" diet focused on grains, fruits, nuts and vegetables, and drink only water. (Some of them eat small amounts of meat and fish.) Sugar is taboo, too. As one Loma Linda centenarian tells Buettner: "I'm very much against sugar except natural sources like fruit, dates or figs. I never eat refined sugar or drink sodas."

Gary Fraser, a cardiologist and epidemiologist at Loma Linda University and an Adventist himself, has found in studies that Adventists who follow the religion's teachings lived about 10 years longer than people who didn't. Another key insight? Pesco-vegetarians in the community, who ate a plant-based diet with up to one serving of fish a day, lived longer than vegan Adventists.

Their top foods include avocados, salmon, nuts, beans, oatmeal, whole wheat bread and soy milk.

Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

We'd love to be invited for dinner by a centenarian here, where they #putaneggonit all the time. One delicious-sounding meal Buettner was served by a 99-year-old woman (who's now 107) consisted of rice and beans, garnished with cheese and cilantro, on corn tortillas, with an egg on top.

As Buettner writes, "The big secret of the Nicoyan diet was the 'three sisters' of Meso-American agriculture: beans, corn and squash." Those three staples, plus papayas, yams, bananas and peach palms (a small Central American oval fruit high in vitamins A and C), are what fuel the region's elders over the century.

Granted, it's not easy to emulate the Blue Zoners if you live in the U.S. where you're likely to be tempted with bacon and cupcakes every day. And maybe you don't want to become a vegan.

But Buettner has plenty to say about simple ways Americans could live like these isolated tribes of exceptional health in The Blue Zone Solution. That's what he's focused on now with the Blue Zone Project: helping communities adapt the cross-cutting tenets of a healthful lifestyle. So far, the project has gotten several towns — and U.S. states — to sign on.

For recipes from the Blue Zones with the ingredients above, check out the web site. And for more photos from the Blue Zones, head to National Geographic.