Latest recipes

The Food Almanac: Friday, March 1, 2013

The Food Almanac: Friday, March 1, 2013

Today's Flavor
This is national Tex-Mex Cooking Day. Today in 1845, President John Tyler annexed Texas to the United States. With the permission of the Texans, of course. A Texas cuisine was already in place. It could even be said that Tex-Mex food was already born. It has grown ever since, with the influence of Germans, Czechs, Africans, and a constant flow of people from Central America. It's still not enough to keep the ballooning chain restaurant cuisine in check, though.

It is also Peanut Butter Lover's Day. And National Pig Day, but I think this is more for their lovable pet image than for the animal's very substantial contribution to the human diet. Today also begins National Celery Month, National Flour Month, National Frozen Food Month, National Nutrition Month, National Noodle Month, National Peanut Month, National Sauce Month, and National Caffeine Awareness Month. I'm aware that I need a cup of coffee to keep track of all that.

Gourmet Gazetteer
Sausage Ponds, Maryland is a pair of long ponds backed up behind earthen dams on a small creek. It's all in Anne Arundel County, near the western shores of Chesapeake Bay, thirty-three miles from Washington, D.C. The area is a mix of farms and country homes. The ponds are listed in a guide to Maryland fishing spots (here), in case you think we're making this one up (and we don't blame you). In case you don't catch anything, the nearest restaurants are in Edgewater, two miles north. We recommend the Wharfside Bar and Grill.

Edible Dictionary
choriqueso, [chore-ee-KAY-so], Spanglish, n.--A portmanteau word of recent vintage, made from "chorizo" and "queso." The former is a peppery sausage. The Mexican variety of chorizo is a fresh sausage that is as often broken down into a ground state as it is served whole. It's different from the fully-cooked, cured, firmer Spanish chorizo. The second half of the word is queso, the generic word for cheese in Spanish. Shoved together, it tell you two things: you have found a Tex-Mex restaurant, and will shortly be served a bowl of melted white cheese with the ground chorizo mixed into it. This usually comes with flour tortillas for wrapping the stuff. It also makes a good dip for tortilla chips.

Deft Dining Rule #227:
If someone tells you where the best chicken-fried steak is to be found, he has eliminated a restaurant from your consideration.

The Saints
Today is St. David's Day in Wales, where he is the patron saint. His symbol is the leek. Many Welshmen wear a leek today in St. David's honor. Or a daffodil; the two are confused with one another in Wales.

The Old Kitchen Sage Sez:
You must always cut a leek from end to end, and pull it apart into its many layers, because you never know what you're going to find in there: a rock, or a diamond.

Music To Eat Bananas By
Harry Belafonte was born in Jamaica today in 1927. He was the leading figure in the calypso craze in America in the 1950s and 1960s. He has long been active in civil rights movements, and still is. "Come mister tally-man, tally me banana," he famously sang in his big hit, The Banana Boat Song. "Day-O! Day-ay-ay-O!"

Sports In Dining
Harry Caray (real name: Carabini) was born today in 1919. I listened to his play-by-play of the Cardinals games in the early 1960s on KMOX in St. Louis on my first transistor radio. But he was more famous for his years with the Chicago Cubs. And for a restaurant in Chicago that bears his name. A sign in front blurts out his favorite expression: "Holy Cow!"

Drink On The High Seas
Today in 1990, New Zealand became the last navy in the world to stop issuing its sailors a daily dram of rum. Seems there were too many problems getting mint for the mojitos.

Food Namesakes
Today in 1912, Captain Albert Berry made the first parachute jump from an airplane in flight, in St. Louis, 1500 feet up. . Suzanna Salter, the first female mayor of an American city, was born today in 1860. She lived to be 101. . Terrence Cardinal Cooke was born today in 1921.

Words To Eat By
"Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love."--Charlie Brown.

Words To Drink By
"Always carry a corkscrew and the wine shall provide itself."--Basil Bunting, British writer, born today in 1900.


February 19, 2019 Volume 65 Issue 24

Launched last spring within Penn Arts and Sciences, the Water Center at Penn serves as a regional hub of water expertise, maintaining a focus on urban water issues and advancing research into innovative and sustainable water solutions.

Thanks to a recent three-year, $1.5 million gift from Spring Point Partners LLC, the Center will have a solid foundation on which to build its research agenda.

Howard Neukrug (C&rsquo78), professor of practice in the department of earth and environmental science and former CEO and commissioner of Philadelphia Water, created the Water Center to confront the increasingly complex challenges of aging and deteriorating water infrastructure, climate change, rapid urbanization and social justice. The Center fosters coordination among Penn researchers to address questions in chemistry, biology, earth and environmental science and medicine and to establish cross-disciplinary support for research on water issues in public health, technology, business, social sciences, urban studies, and city planning and design.

&ldquoThis grant will have an impact at Penn and far beyond, supporting some of the world&rsquos best innovators as they collaborate on water programs, conferences, workshops and research to find solutions to some of the most pressing water challenges,&rdquo said Steven J. Fluharty, SAS dean and Thomas S. Gates, Jr. Professor of Psychology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience. &ldquoBy improving water security and accessibility, their work will have a direct impact on health, social and foreign policy.&rdquo

Spring Point Partners LLC is a social impact venture that provides grants and investments to meet both social and financial outcomes in areas including animal welfare, learning innovations, youth development and sustainable water. The venture previously supported a national conference on water affordability hosted at Penn in May 2018 (Almanac July 17, 2018).

Lichtenstein Challenge Funds for Arts and Sciences Scholarships and Annual Fund

Warren G. Lichtenstein (C&rsquo87) has made a $1 million gift to establish the Warren Lichtenstein Young Alumni Scholarship Challenge Fund and the Warren Lichtenstein Arts and Sciences Challenge Fund.

The Warren Lichtenstein Young Alumni Scholarship Challenge Fund will provide a one-to-one match for gifts from alumni who completed their undergraduate degree within the past 10 years. The resulting endowed scholarships will support students in the College of Arts and Sciences in perpetuity. The Warren Lichtenstein Arts and Sciences Challenge Fund will provide matching funds for gifts to the Arts and Sciences Annual Fund, which supports wide-ranging programs and capital needs across the School.

&ldquoWe are grateful for Warren&rsquos gift, which not only supports financial aid and other priority areas but also inspires the engagement of other alumni and friends,&rdquo said Steven J. Fluharty, SAS Dean and Thomas S. Gates, Jr. Professor of Psychology, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience. &ldquoHis generosity will impact many initiatives and will particularly help us meet the increasing needs of students for whom a Penn education would not be possible without scholarship aid.&rdquo

&ldquoI think it&rsquos important to give back, and Penn provided me with a great education and a solid foundation as I started my career,&rdquo said Mr. Lichtenstein. &ldquoChallenge grants are a way to have graduates stay connected to Penn, support an institution that has contributed to their lives and make a meaningful contribution that will help the next generation of students. I also firmly believe that by getting involved early in philanthropy, young people will make it a part of their lives as they grow and gain success in all their endeavors.&rdquo

Mr. Lichtenstein earned his bachelor&rsquos degree in economics at Penn Arts and Sciences in 1987 and is founder and executive chairman of Steel Partners Holdings LP, a global diversified holding company that engages in multiple businesses. He also serves as executive chairman of Steel Connect, Ltd. and Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings, Inc. He has supported various initiatives at the University, including The Penn Fund and undergraduate scholarships, for more than 15 years.

Helping Create a Safer Campus

Penn students will be able to help assess the University&rsquos progress in promoting a campus free of sexual assault and sexual misconduct. All students are encouraged to participate&mdashregardless of whether they have ever experienced sexual assault or misconduct&mdashand those who complete the survey will receive a $10 Amazon gift card.

The Association of American Universities&rsquo 2019 Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct, which is being conducted in concert with 32 other universities, will take about 20 to 30 minutes to complete.

&ldquoThis survey is an important opportunity for us to understand the experiences of our students,&rdquo said Penn President Amy Gutmann. &ldquoWe need the help and participation of every Penn undergraduate, graduate and professional student to continue to strengthen efforts to create a campus community that is free of sexual harassment, sexual assault and other forms of sexual misconduct.&rdquo

Students have through Sunday, March 10 to answer questions aimed at gathering insight into their knowledge, experience and perceptions related to sexual harassment, sexual assault and other gender-based misconduct. It is especially important that even students who believe they have no previous experience with sexual assault or misconduct on campus participate to gain a complete and accurate picture of the current campus environment.

This survey follows on a similar effort conducted four years ago. In 2015, the AAU&rsquos landmark survey&mdashin which Penn participated&mdashrevealed important insights regarding the prevalence of sexual assault and misconduct on college campuses and students&rsquo attitudes toward these issues. The data collected guided each participating school not just in setting guidelines, but initiating useful changes, that, as President Gutmann described, &ldquohave added and strengthened campus resources available to prevent sexual misconduct and respond equitably and effectively to complaints.&rdquo

The new, confidential survey, which is completely voluntary for students, is being administered by Westat, an independent research firm. To participate, students should click on a unique survey link provided in their email invitations sent out on February 11, or they can visit https://tinyurl.com/AAUSurvey-pobox-upenn-edu and authenticate using their PennKey to access their link.

The more students that take part, the better the outcome. Penn will use the results of this survey to assess current programs and help guide future University policies and programs to encourage a healthy and safe campus environment for everyone.

&ldquoThe aggregate survey responses will enable us to make decisions that are informed by data about our students&rsquo experiences,&rdquo said President Gutmann.&ldquoWe also look forward to hearing students&rsquo ideas for helping Penn realize our commitment to a campus community that is grounded in respect for the dignity and worth of all of our members.&rdquo

[email protected] Town Hall: February 27

Penn&rsquos Human Capital Management Transformation Initiative invites the Penn community to attend a town hall on Wednesday, February 27, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at Fitts Auditorium, Penn Law. You may also view the town hall via video live stream. Learn about [email protected], which launches on July 1, 2019. A cloud-based, integrated modern system, [email protected] will replace many of the current systems that manage faculty affairs, human resources, payroll and other HCM-related processes.

Learn about the basics of [email protected], see a demonstration of self-service capabilities and benefits, and hear about the transition and training plans as the community prepares for going live.

Only those attending in person will have the opportunity to ask questions during the live event. You may submit an anonymous question before the town hall the speakers will respond as time permits. The recording and a summary of live and online questions and answers will be posted on the Workday website after the event for those unable to attend.

A Transformative Integration Agreement between Penn Libraries and the Athenaeum of Philadelphia

The Penn Libraries recently announced a partnership with the Athenaeum of Philadelphia that will transform access to this independent library&rsquos historically rich research collection. The Athenaeum of Philadelphia was founded in 1814 to collect materials connected with American history, antiquities and arts for public benefit. The Athenaeum&rsquos collections complement both the depth and breadth of Penn&rsquos collections. The new relationship between the two institutions provides greater visibility for the Athenaeum and access to their collections by Penn researchers and the wider scholarly community.

A team of library professionals integrated the significant holdings of the Athenaeum into Penn&rsquos library management system, making these items visible when searching among library holdings. Users of the Penn Libraries are also able to receive general collections materials from the Athenaeum through delivery to any of our campus libraries and request as well as to consult special collections materials in the Athenaeum&rsquos reading room.

For Athenaeum members, the Penn-Athenaeum agreement confers borrowing privileges for the millions of volumes held by the Penn Libraries, with circulating books delivered on
request to the Athenaeum.

&ldquoThe partnership between the Athenaeum of Philadelphia and the Penn Libraries confers exceptional benefits on both organizations,&rdquo said Peter Conn, executive director of the Athenaeum. &ldquoPenn&rsquos faculty and students now have access to the Athenaeum&rsquos remarkable collections of architecture, photography, maps and books. And Athenaeum members can borrow books from one of the finest and most comprehensive libraries in the United States.&rdquo

According to Hannah Bennett, director of Penn&rsquos Fisher Fine Arts and Museum Libraries, the new partnership &ldquooffers researchers a deeply rich convergence of collections, enhancing our standing as vital centers of study for architectural history and the city of Philadelphia. It is rewarding to see our collections unlocked for each other and used in this wonderfully streamlined manner and I am sure it will usher in new areas of collaboration going forward.&rdquo

In addition to serving as a boon to the public, this partnership will also deeply benefit a wide variety of academic programs at Penn. The Athenaeum&rsquos strong holdings in art and architecture provide an invaluable lens into the past that will serve as an essential historical component of Penn&rsquos Architecture and Historical Preservation graduate programs.

&ldquoNo city on earth is better equipped to understand the past and prepare for the future,&rdquo said David Brownlee, Penn&rsquos Frances Shapiro Weitzenhoffer Professor of Nineteenth-century European Art. &ldquoPhiladelphia&rsquos fabulous compendium of architecture from every period&mdashcolonial, Greek Revival, High Victorian, Arts and Crafts, modern and post-modern&mdashhas long been a laboratory for Penn research and innovation. Our new library partnership with the Athenaeum of Philadelphia makes easily accessible the Athenaeum&rsquos unmatched collection of historic architectural publications and other documentation for the study of this rich legacy.&rdquo

The Penn-Athenaeum partnership serves as an excellent example of the network that Constantia Constantinou, H. Carton Rogers III Vice Provost and Director of Penn Libraries, seeks to grow. &ldquoThe Penn Libraries is committed to developing a deep network of collaboration to ensure greater access to once hidden or remote collections,&rdquo she said. &ldquoThrough partnerships, we foster greater access to future research with greater commitment to collections, technology innovations and discoverability.&rdquo


Steel Valley, Salvation Army Distribute Food to Students for Weekends

The Steel Valley School District has been distributing more than 260 &ldquograb &rsquon go&rdquo meals to its 1,350 students each weekday since the beginning of the school year.

Beginning Friday, the &ldquoLove In A Backpack&rdquo program began providing food for the weekends as well.

More than 300 backpacks of free food were distributed to students at Steel Valley High School and Barrett Elementary School on Friday, according to District Superintendent Edward Wehrer.

Despite the statewide school shutdown for the coronavirus pandemic, Steel Valley has joined other districts in continuing to offer free school lunches for students in need. Food is available for pick-up at Steel Valley High School and Barrett Elementary School, from 10 a.m. to 12 noon, Monday through Friday.

School counselor Alyson Fisher said in addition to the weekday meals, &ldquowith the parent's permission, every Friday, in light of this global crisis, we now provide food for the weekend.&rdquo

Fisher said the food distribution program has been a success. Along with other school staff, teachers and volunteers, she helped to hand out food bags to students and parents at Barrett Elementary school on Friday.

&ldquoToday, across the district, we are distributing a little more than 300 bags, 150 for the high school and 150 for the elementary school, with the intent of increasing that next Friday, possibly to 400,&rdquo Fisher said. District officials predict those numbers will increase as the crisis continues.

Steel Valley school counselor Allison Fisher, security guard Ann Chapman, teachers Jen Ambrozic and Ryan Dunmire-Kuftic and volunteer Latasha Batch help distribute food bags at Barrett Elementary School on Friday. (Richard Finch Jr. photo, special to Tube City Almanac)

Fisher said the Salvation Army in Homestead reached out to the district last summer, offering to partner with them in distributing food to students. Wehrer expects demand to increase in the weeks and months to come.

&ldquoI feel the demand is increasing, because people are becoming more knowledgeable that this is available,&rdquo Wehrer said. &ldquoWe want to help feed kids, whether they&rsquore from our district, another district or whether they&rsquore not of school age yet.&rdquo

&ldquoOn Tuesday, 260 bags of food were distributed, today we gave out more than 300, that number may increase up to 500 by next Friday,&rdquo Wehrer said. &ldquoWe want to help kids get the nutrition they need, the numbers potentially may continue to increase if we end up serving, not only our own students, but students that are not yet school age or students from other districts, we are not asking for I.D.&rdquo

Wehrer, a graduate of Steel Valley High School and life-long resident, said he understands food insecurity is very real in the district. &ldquoWe have found that food is not a guarantee,&rdquo he said.

There is a lot of uncertainty over the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting school closures, Wehrer said.

&ldquoI think, unfortunately, we're shifting into a new normal for the short-term, maybe even medium-term, and so it's a challenge on what the needs of the community are and how we can best serve them,&rdquo he said.

&ldquoThe school district has the support of the community and we will work together with the local community to support our families and we will get through this,&rdquo Wehrer said.


Pickles, Chutneys, & Chow-Chows.

10 comments:

I've never heard of Philadephia Pickles but this is a try for sure! Love the idea of it. Thanks, Janet.

Thanks for another quite interesting post. Your research is certainly appreciated.

I too do not know the origins of chow-chow, except that I have only seen it, or heard of it, in southern Mississippi and Louisiana in the USA.

An uncle made similar, but called it "pepper relish."

Where does the medieval compost fit into this?
Sandra

HI All. I guess what often happens is that someone makes a well-known dish, and then for reasons of their own, re-names it.
Sandra: good question. Perhaps the amount of sugar?

Here in Canada chow-chow is usually pretty consistant: it's a chopped relish made with green tomatoes(such is the Canadian climate that anyone who grows tomatoes will have an elegant sufficiency of green ones at the end of the season, and the season ends with with a bang, not a whimper), onions, peppers and celery, in a sweet brine with mustard and turmeric.

There is a superb "pimento chutney" in Elizabeth David's "Spices, salt and aromatics" (pp 237-8), which I make often. The base recipe, slightly improbably, is from Escoffier's "Ma cuisine" and it was reworked by Mrs David in Alexandria, during WWII. Not a pedigree to sniff at. Cannot recommend it, provided that it is made with good-quality ingredients, highly enough.

Sounds fantastic, Lapinbizarre. I am definitely going to try it.

I gave a jar to a friend who had grown up in, and was not far removed from, rural South Carolina. Her comment? "That stuff's so good I'd lick it off a wet dog."

Belatedly - thanks Lb, you gave me the laugh of the day. I am going to keep that phrase and use it!


Viewing: Food Business Almanac

NCDA&CS’s Agribusiness Development Section offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. In today’s age of instant sharing, good photography can be the thing that sets your food business apart from your

Food Business Almanac: Internet marketing for food businesses

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through

Food Business Almanac: Hemisphere Beverages

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through

Food Business Almanac: Q&A with Little Black Dressing Co.

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through

Food Business Almanac: Business plans

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through

Food Business Almanac: How to source local products

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through

Food Business Almanac: Major trends for 2014

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through

New gluten-free requirements for food businesses

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through

Food Business Almanac: Breaking down a UPC Code

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through

Food Business Almanac: Product Design

NCDA&CS food business specialist Annette Dunlap offers resources that agribusiness owners and food entrepreneurs can use to grow and manage their business. Annette is available for free one-on-one consultations and can assist business owners with financial and market planning through


Almanac - Friday 11/27/20

Today is Electric Guitar Day, because it's also Jimi Hendrix's birthday too.

Today is Friday, the 27th of November of 2020

November 27 is the 332nd day of the year

34 days remain until the end of the year.

24 days until winter begins

and sunset will be at 4:52 pm.

We will have 9 hours and 49 minutes of daylight.

Solar noon will be at 11:58 am.

The first low tide was at 2:56 am

The first high tide will be at 9:24 am

The next low tide at 4:01 pm

The next high tide at 10:45 pm.

We’ll have a Full Moon and a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

in 3 days on Monday the 30th of November of 2020 at 1:30 am

The November Full Moon is called the Full Beaver Moon.

This was the time when beavers finished preparations for winter and retreated into their lodges.

This moon is also called the Deer Rutting Moon, the Digging and Scratching Moon.

International Systems Engineer Day

National Bavarian Cream Pie Day

National Day of Listening

National Electric Guitar Day

National Native American Heritage Day

National Pins And Needles Day

Lancashire Day in United Kingdom

Maaveerar Day in Tamil Eelam, Sri Lanka

Naval Infantry Day in Russia

1839 – In Boston, Massachusetts, the American Statistical Association is founded.

1895 – At the Swedish–Norwegian Club in Paris, Alfred Nobel signs his last will and testament, setting aside his estate to establish the Nobel Prize after he dies.

1896 – Also sprach Zarathustra by Richard Strauss is first performed.

1924 – In New York City, the first Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is held.

1945 – CARE (then the Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe) was founded to a send CARE Packages of food relief to Europe after World War II.

1968 – Penny Ann Early became the first woman to play major professional basketball for the Kentucky Colonels in an ABA game against the Los Angeles Stars.

1973 – Twenty-fifth Amendment: The United States Senate votes 92–3 to confirm Gerald Ford as Vice President of the United States. (On December 6, the House will confirm him 387–35).

1978 – In San Francisco, city mayor George Moscone and openly gay city supervisor Harvey Milk are assassinated by former supervisor Dan White.

2006 – The House of Commons of Canada approves a motion introduced by Prime Minister Stephen Harper recognizing the Québécois as a nation within Canada.

And if today is your birthday, Happy Birthday To You! You share this special day with…

1820 – Rachel Brooks Gleason, fourth woman to earn a medical degree in the United States (d. 1905)

1843 – Cornelius Vanderbilt II, American businessman (d. 1899)

1874 – Chaim Weizmann, Belarusian-Israeli chemist and politician, 1st President of Israel (d. 1952)

1907 – L. Sprague de Camp, American historian and author (d. 2000)

1909 – James Agee, American novelist, screenwriter, and critic (d. 1955)

1911 – David Merrick, American director and producer (d. 2000)

1917 – Buffalo Bob Smith, American actor and television host (d. 1998)

1925 – Derroll Adams, American folk singer-songwriter and musician (d. 2000)

1932 – Benigno Aquino, Jr., Filipino journalist and politician (d. 1983)

1935 – Les Blank, American director and producer (d. 2013)

1937 – Gail Sheehy, American journalist and author

1940 – Bruce Lee, American-Chinese actor, martial artist, and screenwriter (d. 1973)

1941 – Eddie Rabbitt, American singer-songwriter and guitarist (d. 1998)

1942 – Jimi Hendrix, American singer-songwriter, guitarist, and producer (d. 1970)

1944 – Mickey Leland, American activist and politician (d. 1989)

1945 – James Avery, American actor (d. 2013)

1945 – Randy Brecker, American trumpeter and flugelhornist

1953 – Curtis Armstrong, American actor, singer, and producer

1953 – Steve Bannon, American media executive and political figure

1957 – Caroline Kennedy, American lawyer and diplomat, 29th United States Ambassador to Japan

1960 – Tim Pawlenty, American lawyer and politician, 39th Governor of Minnesota

1960 – Yulia Tymoshenko, Ukrainian economist and politician, 10th Prime Minister of Ukraine

1964 – Robin Givens, American actress

1966 – Andy Merrill, American television writer, producer and voice actor


Almanac - Friday 3/6/20

Today we will have 11 hours and 38 minutes of daylight. The solar transit will be at 12:21 pm.

The first low tide was at 2:13 am

and the next low tide at 3:06 pm.

The first high tide will be at 8:12 am

and the next high tide at 10:17 pm.

The Moon is 85.9% visible a Waxing Gibbous

Next Moonrise: Today at 2:45 pm

Full Moon in 3 days on Sunday the 9th of March of 2020 at 9:48 am

Last Quarter Moon in 10 days on a Tuesday the 16th of March of 2020 at 1:34 am

New Moon in 18 days Tuesday the 24th of March of 2020 at 1:28 am

First Quarter Moon in 25 days on a Wednesday the 1st of April of 2020 at 2:21 am

1836 – Texas Revolution: Battle of the Alamo – After a thirteen-day siege by an army of 3,000 Mexican troops, the 187 Texas volunteers, including frontiersman Davy Crockett and colonel Jim Bowie, defending the Alamo are killed and the fort is captured.

European Day of the Righteous, commemorates those who have stood up against crimes against humanity and totalitarism with their own moral responsibility.

Foundation Day (Norfolk Island), the founding of Norfolk Island in 1788.

Independence Day (Ghana), celebrates the independence of Ghana from the UK in 1957.

The Day of the Dude, celebrated by the adherents of Dudeism

On this day in Women’s History…

1921 Police in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, issue an edict requiring Women to wear skirts at least 4 inches below the knee

Born on this day in 1937 – Valentina Tereshkova, Russian general, pilot, and cosmonaut, the first woman to travel from earth, to space, and back to earth.

March 6, 1986 – Georgia O’Keefe dies. She was a pre-eminent artist who laid the foundation for American modernism with her paintings of enlarged flowers and New Mexico landscapes.

Also on this day in history…

632 – The Farewell Sermon (Khutbah, Khutbatul Wada') of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.

1869 – Dmitri Mendeleev presents the first periodic table to the Russian Chemical Society.

1957 – Ghana becomes the first Sub-Saharan country to gain independence from the British.

And if today is your birthday, Happy Birthday To You! You share this special day with…

1475 – Michelangelo, Italian painter and sculptor (d. 1564)

1619 – Cyrano de Bergerac, French author and playwright (d. 1655)

1806 – Elizabeth Barrett Browning, English-Italian poet and translator (d. 1861)

1893 – Furry Lewis, American singer-songwriter and guitarist (d. 1981)

1905 – Bob Wills, American Western swing musician, songwriter, and bandleader (d. 1975)

1906 – Lou Costello, American actor and comedian (d. 1959)

1917 – Will Eisner, American illustrator and publisher (d. 2005)

1923 – Ed McMahon, American comedian, game show host, and announcer (d. 2009)

1923 – Wes Montgomery, American guitarist and songwriter (d. 1968)

1926 – Alan Greenspan, American economist and politician

1927 – Gabriel García Márquez, Colombian journalist and author, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 2014)

1930 – Lorin Maazel, French-American violinist, composer, and conductor (d. 2014)

1936 – Marion Barry, American lawyer and politician, 2nd Mayor of the District of Columbia (d. 2014)

1939 – Adam Osborne, Thai-Indian engineer and businessman, founded the Osborne Computer Corporation (d. 2003)

1944 – Kiri Te Kanawa, New Zealand soprano and actress

1946 – David Gilmour, English singer-songwriter and guitarist

1947 – Rob Reiner, American actor, director, producer, and activist

1967 – Glenn Greenwald, American journalist and author

1972 – Shaquille O'Neal, American basketball player, actor, and rappers Friday, the 6th of March of 2020.

It is the 65th day of the year.

242 days until presidential elections

(7 months and 28 days from today)

300 days remain until the end of the year.

and the sun sets at 6:10 pm.

Today we will have 11 hours and 38 minutes of daylight. The solar transit will be at 12:21 pm.

The first low tide was at 2:13 am

and the next low tide at 3:06 pm.

The first high tide will be at 8:12 am

and the next high tide at 10:17 pm.

The Moon is 85.9% visible a Waxing Gibbous

Next Moonrise: Today at 2:45 pm

Full Moon in 3 days on Sunday the 9th of March of 2020 at 9:48 am

Last Quarter Moon in 10 days on a Tuesday the 16th of March of 2020 at 1:34 am

New Moon in 18 days Tuesday the 24th of March of 2020 at 1:28 am

First Quarter Moon in 25 days on a Wednesday the 1st of April of 2020 at 2:21 am

1836 – Texas Revolution: Battle of the Alamo – After a thirteen-day siege by an army of 3,000 Mexican troops, the 187 Texas volunteers, including frontiersman Davy Crockett and colonel Jim Bowie, defending the Alamo are killed and the fort is captured.

European Day of the Righteous, commemorates those who have stood up against crimes against humanity and totalitarism with their own moral responsibility.

Foundation Day (Norfolk Island), the founding of Norfolk Island in 1788.

Independence Day (Ghana), celebrates the independence of Ghana from the UK in 1957.

The Day of the Dude, celebrated by the adherents of Dudeism

On this day in Women’s History…

1921 Police in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, issue an edict requiring Women to wear skirts at least 4 inches below the knee

Born on this day in 1937 – Valentina Tereshkova, Russian general, pilot, and cosmonaut, the first woman to travel from earth, to space, and back to earth.

March 6, 1986 – Georgia O’Keefe dies. She was a pre-eminent artist who laid the foundation for American modernism with her paintings of enlarged flowers and New Mexico landscapes.

Also on this day in history…

632 – The Farewell Sermon (Khutbah, Khutbatul Wada') of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.

1869 – Dmitri Mendeleev presents the first periodic table to the Russian Chemical Society.

1957 – Ghana becomes the first Sub-Saharan country to gain independence from the British.

And if today is your birthday, Happy Birthday To You! You share this special day with…

1475 – Michelangelo, Italian painter and sculptor (d. 1564)

1619 – Cyrano de Bergerac, French author and playwright (d. 1655)

1806 – Elizabeth Barrett Browning, English-Italian poet and translator (d. 1861)

1893 – Furry Lewis, American singer-songwriter and guitarist (d. 1981)

1905 – Bob Wills, American Western swing musician, songwriter, and bandleader (d. 1975)

1906 – Lou Costello, American actor and comedian (d. 1959)

1917 – Will Eisner, American illustrator and publisher (d. 2005)

1923 – Ed McMahon, American comedian, game show host, and announcer (d. 2009)

1923 – Wes Montgomery, American guitarist and songwriter (d. 1968)

1926 – Alan Greenspan, American economist and politician

1927 – Gabriel García Márquez, Colombian journalist and author, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 2014)

1930 – Lorin Maazel, French-American violinist, composer, and conductor (d. 2014)

1936 – Marion Barry, American lawyer and politician, 2nd Mayor of the District of Columbia (d. 2014)

1939 – Adam Osborne, Thai-Indian engineer and businessman, founded the Osborne Computer Corporation (d. 2003)


Food Business Almanac: HACCP and GMP

Even though it may look like alphabet soup, HACCP and GMP are important terms for food entrepreneurs to know. They both are critical to ensuring the safety of your product, whether it’s sliced apples or barbecue sauce. To find out more about these two terms, Annette interviewed Kristen Baughman, outreach coordinator for the department’s Food and Drug Protection Division. In the video below, Kristen explains the difference between HACCP and GMP:

HACCP, which stands for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point, is a science-based monitoring system for identifying and controlling chemical, physical and biological hazards at different points in the production process.

Currently, HACCP plans are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for fish, fishery products, juices, nectary products and rabbit. The FDA also has proposed rules that would require HACCPs for fresh-cut produce, but these have not been implemented yet. Meat and poultry products are regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

It takes work to develop and implement GMPs and HACCPs for a food business. Fortunately, the department offers services that can assist you. For meat-based products, contact the Meat and Poultry Inspection Division. Contact the Food and Drug Protection Division for all non-meat or rabbit products.

Following are seven principles of HACCP accepted by government agencies, trade associations and the international food industry:

  1. Conduct a hazard analysis
  2. Determine the critical control points
  3. Establish critical limits
  4. Establish monitoring procedures
  5. Establish corrective actions
  6. Establish verification procedures
  7. Establish record-keeping and documentation procedures

Good Manufacturing Practices, or GMPs, should be an integral part of any HACCP plan. GMPs are preventative guidelines for plant and facility operations. Most GMPs address the following:


Food Business Almanac: Product Design

The old adage that a picture is worth a thousand words is especially true when it comes to designing food labels and packaging. You have about three seconds to grab a customer’s attention as they walk down the store aisle, and the way to get noticed is to have an eye-catching and attractive design.

There are three important tips to keep in mind as you design your package:

1. Design to appeal to your customer
2. Distinguish yourself from your competition
3. Display your product proudly

Earlier this year, the N.C. Specialty Foods Association named finalists in its product awards competition. Let’s see how those finalists used these tips in their package and label design.

Design to appeal to your customer
First, know what motivates your customer and use appropriate colors. Black is considered elegant, and that’s the message you get when you look at Little Black Dressing. Orange stimulates hunger and is a good choice for Sweet Neecy’s Spice Cake Mix. Sweet Neecy’s Chocolate Cake Mix is covered with a brown label to distinguish it from the Spice Cake Mix and to let customers know it contains chocolate. Purple is used to complement the elderberry jam and jelly of Norm’s Farms’ products. It is also a color associated with elegance. The green on the label also sends a message of “fresh” and “healthy.”

Distinguish yourself from your competition
Next, be distinctive. This means that you need to know who your competitors are, what color schemes they use, and what their packages look like. You don’t want consumers to think of you as a “me, too” brand. You want them to think of you as the “me, only” brand.

Little Black Dressing’s distinctive logo of a woman in a black hat and black cocktail dress definitely is different from other dressing labels. Sweet Neecy’s use of a pouch, instead of the more traditional box packaging for a cake mix, also does a good job of setting this product apart from the competition.

Display your product proudly
Finally, show off your product. Design your packaging so customers can either see the contents through the packaging, or have a photograph of your product on the label. Customers want to know what they are buying. Mackey’s Ferry Peanuts and Norm’s Farms’ jam and jelly use clear packaging to show their products.


The Old Farmer's Almanac 2014

Accept no substitutes! America’s oldest continuously published periodical and best-loved annual is often imitated but never equaled. This is the one, the only, Old Farmer’s Almanac! Featuring:

• An astronomy quiz to test your Sky-Q
• Anglers’ six favorite fish and secrets to hooking them
• Vegetables and other perennial edibles to grow
• The time in our lives: where it goes, ways to make the most of it, and more
• The whole truth about whole grains
• How to get bitten by a pet (if you’re not careful)
• Rings around Earth (think Saturn) that might influence our weather
• Health tips for each zodiac sign
• Envelope and napkin jottings that changed the world
• Plus: Moon phases and other celestial sightings, tides, historic trivia, gardening tables, best days, and too much more to mention!
• Full-color winter and summer weather maps

Отзывы - Написать отзыв

A musthave for the farmer in your home!

I buy this farmers almanac for my boyfriend every year for Christmas. He swears by it and tends his vegetable garden by info it provides. Читать весь отзыв

Farmers Almanac

The hardcover is very nice and the material in the book goes well beyond the weather. I was surprised at the number of ads throughout the pages but this was my first time purchasing the almanac. It was a great Christmas gift! Читать весь отзыв


Watch the video: Αγία Παρασκευή 2010 Β - Χαλκίδα - (September 2021).