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Peanut, Ginger and Coriander Dipping Sauce recipe

Peanut, Ginger and Coriander Dipping Sauce recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Sauce

Chunky peanut butter, garlic, fresh ginger and coriander blended into an exotic Asian-style dipping sauce or marinade. Use sweetened or unsweetened peanut butter, depending on your preference.

27 people made this

IngredientsServes: 16

  • 150g (5 oz) chunky peanut butter
  • 100ml (4 fl oz) groundnut oil
  • 4 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 10 sprigs fresh coriander, finely chopped
  • 1 dessertspoon dried crushed chillies
  • 1 dessertspoon minced fresh root ginger

MethodPrep:20min ›Ready in:20min

  1. In a food processor, thoroughly blend all ingredents until smooth. Cover, and refrigerate until serving.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(26)

Reviews in English (25)

by Julie Hoetmer Ryan

I've used this recipe a couple of times. I used it as a dipping sauce for thai salad rolls and as a marinade for grilled chicken salad. Both meals were delicious.-28 Feb 2003

by MissVeeKee

I made this for my boyfriend's birthday bash and I doubled the recipe. It went much further than I expected and brought half of it to work the next week. I can't tell you how many people asked for the recipe! And they all had ideas for other ways to use it - salad dressing, add coconut milk and pour over chicken, etc. They kept coming back for more. I served it with veggies (snap peas are perfect) and pretzels. I will definitely make it again. It was so easy too.-27 Sep 2006

by EERICKSON

I used half of this recipe to marinate chopped chicken breast which I then stir-fried with asparagus and mushrooms. I served it over rice. I warmed up the other half of the sauce and drizzled some over the chicken and rice. I also served it as a dipping sauce for Schwan's Pork Potstickers. It was delicious! Thanks for a great recipe!-12 Feb 2004


Peanut, Ginger and Coriander Dipping Sauce recipe - Recipes

Oh boy, this looks so good! Your beef satay with this sauce is on my weekend menu for sure. I can't wait.

I didn't get what you said about not using peanut butter brands?

So should I get organic peanut butter?

If I use Skippy peanut butter how much of the brown sugar must i cut back?

Organic doesn't matter, just look at the label and it should just contain peanuts and maybe salt. Can't give you how much sugar to add. but simply add it to taste.

There's another Asian variation of the satay sauce (what we call peanut sauce in Singapore/Malaysia/Indonesia) which is a lot more watery, spicier, and made with grounded peanuts so whenever you dip the meat in, you'll always get chunky bits of peanuts and the texture goes well with the meat in my opinion. Maybe you can try out this variation of the peanut sauce, Chef John. I always like seeing how people play around with the recipes.

I have tasted the peanut butter version of the sauce too and while it still has the nutty flavor, I found it a little too thick for my liking.

But we can all agree the sauce is addicting. =P

Hi Chef John--I'm your #1 Thai-American fan, and I will attest that you serve chicken, pork, and beef satay with both peanut sauce, toast (to eat the leftover peanut sauce), AND the peppery-vinegary dip. Love your work and so grateful for your help for home cooks!

Beef marinating and trying to stop dipping into the peanut sauce before company arrives. Thanks for this!

I made this for dinner the other night along with the satay. I'm embarassed to say that I ate EVERYTHING I made. In one setting. It was THAT good.

What brand is the coconut that you use to make this?

Don't remember, but any brand works!

Hi Chef John,
This sauce is delish! Goes perfectly with my rice paper wrapped spring rolls. Thanks a lot!!

Have to say this recipe looks a lot simpilar and quicker to make than my Thai style recipe. Mine includes red onion peanut oil garlic, tumeric, cumin, coriander. Sweet chilli sauce, peanut butter and coconut cream. May try this one and see how to compares

First off, thank you for all the videos you post!

I made this peanut sauce last week to go with the beef satay skewers and brought both in to work to share for grill night. The beef came out excellent, but the sauce came out much thicker than I anticipated. Do you have any suggestions on how to make it thinner?

Novice in the kitchen, but getting the hang of it, btw.

Just thin with some hot water! Thanks!

You mention this as an appetizer. Any suggestions (one of your recipes) that I can follow this up with?

Hi Chef John,
Can I use it with fish (such as Tilapia of Salmon)?

p.s.
I love your recipes!! The best cooking experience and taste I have ever had

OMG Used Jif peanut butter & it separated & looked awful! I did it twice just to make sure I hadnt made any mistakes. Its got to be the JIF brand peanut butter!

Both the satay and the peanut sauce were fantastic. Better than any restaurant version I’ve ever had.
Just one question - how long is it safe to keep the peanut sauce (refrigerated, of course)? Because of the raw garlic, I’m concerned about botulism, but I don’t want to throw out the delicious sauce if it’s ok.

Sort of late to the party, but if you are REALLY LAZY - and sometimes I admit that I am. - if you take the peanut butter or POWDERED peanut butter and add some sesame-ginger salad dressing (the one with the blue-eyed actor on the label!! ) and mix them together to taste, you have an easy-peasy peanut sauce!! Not as GOOD as Chef John's, but it will do in a pinch. :-)


HOW TO MAKE THAI PEANUT SHRIMP

  • Pour the vegetable oil into a large skillet and turn up the burner to medium high heat.
  • Add the shrimp to the large skillet and sauté them.
  • Take the shrimp out of the pan and set them aside for later.
  • Combine the sauce ingredients and let them reduce for five minutes.
  • Toss the shrimp back and stir them into in the peanut sauce.
  • Add fresh cilantro and chopped peanuts over the top as a garnish.

PLATE IT UP

  • Red pepper flakes: sprinkle red pepper flakes onto the shrimp once you’ve plated it to give it a hint of spice and a pleasant crunch.
  • Rice noodles: instead of serving Thai peanut shrimp on rice, you can cook up rice noodles. The peanut sauce goes really well with the texture of the noodles. <— This is one of my favorite dinners. EVER. I also like to do half rice noodles and half zoodles.
  • Greens: chop up some fresh vegetables like red bell peppers, green onions, snow peas, sweet potato or water chestnuts and sauté them with the shrimp or stir fry them separate and drizzle with peanut sauce.
  • Fish sauce: add just a dab of fish sauce to add rich umami flavor to your dinner. A little goes a long way, so start small and work your way up.
  • Crushed peanuts: pulverize shelled, peeled peanuts into crumbs and sprinkle them over your shrimp. The peanuts add a little salt and a whole lot of crunch.

What to Serve with Thai Peanut Shrimp:

We love serving classic dim sum appetizers like Potstickers, Crab Rangoon, Egg Rolls, Spring Rolls or Coconut Shrimp with Sweet and Sour Dipping Sauce and then we serve this shrimp over Chinese Steamed Rice or Lo Mein.

For a more unique twist on pairings here are some more fun ideas:

  • Thai Peanut Zucchini Noodles: if you are counting carbs and don’t want rice with your Thai shrimp, you can follow the directions for zucchini noodles from this recipe. Keep in mind that zucchini noodles add a lot of moisture to a meal, so you make want to strain them once they’ve cooked.
  • Cold Thai Noodle Salad: light and refreshing, Thai noodle salad is fantastic for summer meals and won’t leave you too full to enjoy the main course.
  • Hot and Sour Soup: originally from China, hot and sour soup is an Asian comfort food that is delicious and hearty.

Shrimp Safe Cooking Temperatures:

According to the USDA’s website, shrimp is safe to eat at 145 degrees F (62.8 degrees C).

Some sushi restaurants will serve raw shrimp so you may feel like serving undercooked shrimp is not an issue. They are very careful in sourcing their seafood and making sure it is incredibly fresh. I can’t vouch for your local grocer, so please don’t try eating undercooked shrimp or you will remember this meal for all the wrong reasons.


Thai Chicken Satay with Peanut Dipping Sauce

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An easy appetizer or make it a main dish! I grilled them outside but these simple chicken skewers can be made indoors too! Thai-style chicken satay served along side my slightly sweet and slightly spicy peanut dipping sauce.

Chicken-on-a-stick, friends. On a STICCCCCK. Ya dig?

Is it me or is this the only way to make Friday even better? Anything on a stick is usually delicious but I have got to say, the hubby RAVED about my simple chicken satay and honestly, they were worthy!

This is LIFE. Simple, easy food that’s worth raving about.

Here’s the thing. Do you really need me to go on about how i’m just short of being obsessed with these chicken skewers? Because you know I can and will. But let me save my breath and just know that I wouldn’t steer you wrong when it comes to making super flavorful meals that are light on the waistline and kid friendly.

With that said, this peanut dipping sauce is dyna-mite. The first time I used them was for my vietnamese spring rolls. Kids, I almost could not believe that this was something I made. Holy moly!

Let’s jump right into the recipe as there are a couple thing you need to know.

  1. this is easy! I mean so so so easy. Toss-a-few-ingredients-in-a-bag-and-let-boneless-skinless-chicken-strips-hang-out-and-do-their-thing-for-a-while easy.
  2. chicken satay aka chicken on a stick aka the kids will love it
  3. flavorful. I mean like serious, serious flavor. As in it’s a party for your whole mouth- so good that you kinda wanna get up and dance – lick the plate clean kind of flavorful.
  4. see numbers 1-3

The main ingredients for this recipe are lemongrass paste, ginger, garlic, red onions, fish sauce, brown sugar, and soy sauce. There are also a few spices like, turmeric, cumin, and coriander.

I used lemongrass and ginger paste that I get from the refrigerated section of the grocery store, think the brand is Gourmet Garden. It’s easier than finding whole lemongrass but either will do. Also, minced garlic in a jar is my most favoritest thing ever. ? The hubby and I are garlic fiends (him more than me) but this stuff saves soo much time. I can’t believe i’m about to say this, but I buy the large tubs of it Costco. .

And a few words about the fish sauce. DON’T SMELL IT. Seriously don’t. If you’ve never made Thai food before, this little ingredient is a wonder! It flavors everything so nicely but whatever you do, don’t take a whiff of the stuff when it’s in it’s purest form in the bottle.

Trust me, you WILL be sorry. Speaking from major experience here.

Moving along.

I let the chicken satay mixture marinate for 3-12 hours. The chicken becomes so flavorful and it requires just a quick 5-7 minutes on the grill. Also! If you don’t have a grill you can easily make these in a cast iron skillet indoors. Just prepare the chicken satay on skewers and drizzle a small amount of oil in the skillet before cooking. It may take a few additional minutes and you’l have to rotate it but as long as you get to enjoy chicken satay, right?

And here’s a tip! If you’re grilling these outdoors and using wooden skewers, let the skewers soak in water for at least 1 and up to 12 hours in advance. The sticks don’t burn and disintegrate as quickly if they are wet.

And now for the dipping sauce! It’s simple I promise. All you need is a little peanut butter, minced garlic, ginger paste (or grated), soy sauce, brown sugar, lime juice, toasted sesame oil, and sriracha. Mix it all up in a bowl. The peanut butter can be a little tough to stir so I like to add 1-2 tablespoons of hot water to help the mixture blend together a little better. This also helps the brown sugar dissolve. You can make the peanut dipping sauce up to 2 days in advance if you’d like. And i’ve used it as salad dressing too and it’s perfect, in every way.

And here’s a tip for my friends with a peanut allergy, swap the peanut butter out with cashew butter. It’s just as good.

This kind of chicken satay recipe is exactly what the weekend is all about. Get together with your significant other and make chicken on a stick with the most addicting sauce you’ve ever tasted. It’s easy to make and requires minimal hands on time. Or better yet, email them the recipe and have them make it for you?


Beef skewers with peanut sauce

'Tis the season for getting reacquainted with your barbecue and although entertaining a bunch of people in the backyard isn't quite permitted as of yet, your family or close friends are a good enough reason to sharpen those skills anyway.

Marinating meats is one of the best ways to maximize flavour and tenderness, especially when it comes to tougher cuts of Canadian beef like sirloin tip or round steak. All it takes is a few items you likely have kickin' around in your pantry and some time. The length of time you should marinate is up for debate, but generally should be no less than one hour and should not exceed 12 hours.

When it comes to assembling skewers with marinated beef and (vegetables), it is actually easier to do the skewer assembly beforehand. Most people use wooden skewers and allowing the wood to sit in the marinating liquid as well will prevent them from burning on the grill, sort of similar to when you soak a cedar plank before barbecuing with it.


This is the curry powder I use – Clive of India which is widely available in Australia at supermarkets. Yes, this is an Indian curry. It doesn’t really matter what type of curry powder you use because it’s just a subtle background flavour. I promise!


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What Is Peanut Sauce Used For?

This easy Thai Peanut Dressing goes as well with grilled chicken as it does with plain veggies in a salad. I love the "throw things in, mix and eat" type of recipes and this is definitely one of those. I think my next endeavor needs to be Thai Chicken to go with this peanut dressing, although I've also been thinking of a Chinese cold sesame chicken style dish (except you know, peanut instead of sesame).

My ideas for what sounds delicious with this Peanut Dressing Recipe and what you find appetizing may differ. If that's the case here are a few more ideas of things you might enjoy pairing it with:

  • Chicken
  • Pork
  • Beef
  • Dip for Veggies
  • Salad Dressing

How Do You Make Peanut Sauce From Scratch?

  • Put all ingredients into a blender, being sure to use hot water to emulsify the peanut butter
  • Whirl
  • Done

Spicy Chicken Satay Recipe

The full ingredients list and instructions are found in the printable recipe card at the end of this post. I highly recommend reading the blog post all the way through so that you don&rsquot miss any tips or substitution suggestions to ensure that you have all the ingredients and equipment required, and to understand the steps and timings involved.

Satay is a popular street food in Southeast Asia &ndash and is a popular dish when I serve it!

Whenever I make skewers of chicken satay for a party, they always get gobbled up quickly! The great thing about them is that they taste delicious when hot, but taste just as good when at room temperature!

Satay is a Southeast Asian dish of seasoned, grilled meat &ndash often chicken, but also other meats like beef, pork, or lamb, as well as fish, and vegetarian options like tofu. They&rsquore usually served with a dipping sauce &ndash usually made with soy and peanuts &ndash which is often just called satay sauce.

You can serve this spicy chicken satay as an appetizer at a dinner party, or even as a light entrée when paired with some noodles, rice, and vegetables.

This flavor-packed recipe can also be doubled or tripled for larger party crowds.


Gordon Ramsay's chicken satay with peanut sauce recipe

One lunchtime, as I parked my car in Penang, I discovered an amazing satay stall. Drifting over was the smell of the chicken sizzling on the hot coals, the distinctive marinade with its spices being charred. In the corner, next to the grill, a sizeable tub of peanut sauce was eagerly waiting to be dipped into. I was left with little choice but to tuck in &ndash and it didn't disappoint.

Although this satay chicken recipe is quite quick to prepare, marinating is key the meat needs to be left for at least 12 hours for a more developed flavour. To achieve the best flavour you should only use meat off the bone.

I would recommend barbecuing the skewers to get that smoky flavour, but you can also use a grill or griddle pan. You can also substitute the chicken for pork, beef or prawns.

loveFOOD recommends: this cast-iron griddle pan can be used on gas and induction hobs.

Ingredients

  • 500 g chicken thighs, skinned and deboned
  • 3 shallots, peeled and coarsley chopped
  • 2 garlic cloaves, peeled and coarsley chopped
  • 3 cm knob of galangal (or root ginger) peeled and grated
  • 2 lemongrass stalks, trimmed and white part finely chopped
  • 1 cm knob of tumeric root peeled or 1tsp ground tumeric
  • 1 tbsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp palm sugar or dark brown sugar
  • 1 pinch of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 0.5 chilli, deseeded and chopped
  • 4 tbsp peanut oil or groundnut oil for brushing
  • 17.6 oz chicken thighs, skinned and deboned
  • 3 shallots, peeled and coarsley chopped
  • 2 garlic cloaves, peeled and coarsley chopped
  • 3 cm knob of galangal (or root ginger) peeled and grated
  • 2 lemongrass stalks, trimmed and white part finely chopped
  • 1 cm knob of tumeric root peeled or 1tsp ground tumeric
  • 1 tbsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp palm sugar or dark brown sugar
  • 1 pinch of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 0.5 chilli, deseeded and chopped
  • 4 tbsp peanut oil or groundnut oil for brushing
  • 17.6 oz chicken thighs, skinned and deboned
  • 3 shallots, peeled and coarsley chopped
  • 2 garlic cloaves, peeled and coarsley chopped
  • 3 cm knob of galangal (or root ginger) peeled and grated
  • 2 lemongrass stalks, trimmed and white part finely chopped
  • 1 cm knob of tumeric root peeled or 1tsp ground tumeric
  • 1 tbsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp palm sugar or dark brown sugar
  • 1 pinch of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 0.5 chilli, deseeded and chopped
  • 4 tbsp peanut oil or groundnut oil for brushing
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 shallot, peeled and finely diced
  • 1 red chilli, deseeded if you prefer
  • 1 tbsp crushed garlic
  • 1 tbsp crushed ginger
  • 4 tbsp crunchy peanut butter
  • 1 tsp tamarind paste
  • 1 tsp dark sweet soy sauce
  • 100 ml coconut cream
  • 50 ml water
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 shallot, peeled and finely diced
  • 1 red chilli, deseeded if you prefer
  • 1 tbsp crushed garlic
  • 1 tbsp crushed ginger
  • 4 tbsp crunchy peanut butter
  • 1 tsp tamarind paste
  • 1 tsp dark sweet soy sauce
  • 3.5 fl oz coconut cream
  • 1.8 fl oz water
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 shallot, peeled and finely diced
  • 1 red chilli, deseeded if you prefer
  • 1 tbsp crushed garlic
  • 1 tbsp crushed ginger
  • 4 tbsp crunchy peanut butter
  • 1 tsp tamarind paste
  • 1 tsp dark sweet soy sauce
  • 0.4 cup coconut cream
  • 0.2 cup water

Details

  • Cuisine: Malaysian
  • Recipe Type: Starter
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Preparation Time: 30 mins
  • Cooking Time: 20 mins
  • Serves: 6

Step-by-step

For the satay skewers

  1. Slice the chicken into thin strips and set to one side.
  2. Grind together the shallots, garlic, galangal, lemongrass, turmeric and the remaining spices in a food processor or a pestle and mortar until you have a rough paste. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt, sugar and pepper. Add the fish sauce and chilli and combine. Mix the paste with the peanut oil and add to the chicken, tossing to coat well. Cover with cling film and leave to marinate in the fridge overnight, to allow all the various flavours to develop.
  3. Soak 16 bamboo skewers (approximately 15cm long) in warm water (this will prevent them scorching) half an hour before you are ready to cook the chicken.
  4. When you are ready, thread the marinated chicken onto the skewers until they are three-quarters full, but be careful not to overcrowd each skewer. Brush the griddle pan with oil.
  5. Allow the griddle pan to get very hot and, when ready, gently lay the satay sticks onto it. Baste the chicken with oil occasionally during cooking.
  6. Grill the chicken until it has cooked through and has begun to pick up a few crispy brown-black spots, about 5&ndash7 minutes, turning frequently. If you are cooking the satay sticks on the barbecue the time may vary depending on how hot the coals are.

For the peanut sauce

  1. Place a saucepan over a medium heat. Add the oil followed by the shallot, chilli, garlic and ginger. Sauté for 2&ndash3 minutes until the shallots are softened and the oil begins to take on the red colour of the chilli.
  2. Add in the peanut butter and stir, breaking it down. It should start to melt. Now add the tamarind paste and dark soy sauce and stir well. Pour the coconut cream and water into the saucepan and stir for 3&ndash4 minutes, until the peanut butter has been incorporated into the satay sauce.
  3. Simmer the mixture on a low heat for around 1&ndash2 minutes, then turn off the heat. Serve warm with the chicken skewers.

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