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Guinness Launches First Non-Alcoholic Lager in Ireland

Guinness Launches First Non-Alcoholic Lager in Ireland

The beverage will be available Ireland-wide in March, 2018

Dreamstime

The makers of Guinness have released a non-alcoholic lager called Open Gate Pure Brew that is being sold in 250 pubs in Dublin with a rollout Ireland-wide planned for March. Diageo-owned Guinness is selling Pure Brew, which has an ABV of 0.5 percent, in 300-milliliter bottles. The brand describes the beer as a “full-flavored, crisp golden lager with a fruity, hoppy taste.”

At Pure Brew’s launch event at Dublin 8’s Open Gate Brewery, Diageo’s global head of beer, Mark Sandys, said, “With Pure Brew, our brewers have developed a great-tasting, fully brewed and fully fermented non-alcoholic lager that stands shoulder-to-shoulder with our other great beers.”

“Consumers shouldn’t have to compromise on taste on occasions when choosing not to drink or to moderate their alcohol intake, so we are excited to be offering more choice with our latest innovation from the Open Gate Brewery.”

This is not the beer brand’s first foray into non-alcoholic brews. Guinness sells Guinness Zero in Indonesia to compete with strict alcohol regulations, according to Beverage Daily. Can’t imagine strict alcohol regulations? Alcohol is illegal in these countries.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


Guinness goes non-alcoholic with new Pure Brew lager, and we’ve put it to the taste test

THE brewers of the black stuff are trialling a new beer that has none of the befuddling stuff in it.

Guinness chiefs have hailed their new non-alcoholic lager as the saviour of rural pubs.

And they claimed that seven out of ten drinkers couldn’t tell that Pure Brew contained no alcohol in blind tests with normal beers.

The scoop will be rolled out to 250 pubs in Dublin this month, before going nationwide from March, selling at €3.50 a bottle.

Lead brewer John Casey told how his team at Open Gate — the experiments wing of the drinks giant’s famous St James’s Gate HQ — had to rip up the recipe book on cold-sober booze to produce the new tipple.

He said: “Many non-alcoholic beers are made by taking a conventional beer and boiling away the alcohol, which can impact the taste.

“We were determined to brew a non-alcoholic beer with the same process that we’ve perfected over the last 259 years.

“It’s taken two years of experimentation, but we’ve come up with a way to brew beer using a special yeast strain that only produces a very limited amount of alcohol.”

The result — boasting an ABV of just 0.5 per cent — could prove a timely lifeline for Ireland’s pub trade.

The crackdown on drink-driving has been blamed, in part, for forcing more than 1,500 boozers to call time over the past decade.

And vintner groups have warned that new proposals could be the death knell for members in rural areas, where punters have no option but to travel by car.

The new Road Traffic Bill proposes an automatic three-month ban on drivers with 51mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood — equivalent of drinking less than a pint.

MOST READ IN FABULOUS

NAME GAME

CROWN JEWEL

SUNS OUT, BUMS OUT

WHAT A BOOB

NO KIDDING

LETTUCE SLEEP

TOYBOY JOY

TACKS NOT IDEAL

MYSTIC MEG

PLEA FOR HELP

Transport Minister Shane Ross has also said he wants the legal limit to be “very close to zero” in a bid to save lives.

Diageo’s Global Head of Beer, Mark Sandys, explained research showed current non-alcoholic beers don’t offer non-drinkers “a reason to go into the pub”.

He said: “People do think it’s a compromise if they’re drinking water all night, or sugary soft drinks, therefore we wanted them to have something which still looked like it was part of the beer experience.”

Open Gate’s light relief for purists

Aran Brazil, the Irish Sun's Beer Columnist

MY first encounter with Open Gate Pure Brew was at a preview tasting for beer writers.

We were told only that it was “a lager”, and the nose wasn’t unlike Hop House 13, one of Guinness’s more successful recent launches.

It took just a sip to realise this was a non-alcoholic beer, albeit a rather good one.

Naturally brewed with Australian and American hops to 0.5 per cent ABV (the maximum for non-alcoholic drinks under EU law) it is light-bodied with soft citrus notes and melon-ish sweetness, medium fizz and a dry finish.

Thankfully, it avoids the overpowering cereal sweetness of many NA beers.

I ended up drinking about three of my own accord after the panel test, and think it will make a welcome addition to the bar fridge for non-imbibers on a night out.


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