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Japanese-Style Potato Salad with Daikon and Cucumber

Japanese-Style Potato Salad with Daikon and Cucumber

Ingredients

Dressing

  • 1/2 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped celery
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped white onion

Salad

  • 2 3/4 pounds russet potatoes (about 4 very large), peeled, sliced into 1/2-inch-thick rounds
  • 1 2-inch-long piece daikon (Japanese white radish),* peeled, halved lengthwise, cut crosswise into 1/8-inch-thick slices
  • 1 large carrot, peeled, cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
  • 8 large escarole leaves, torn into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 cup very thinly sliced red onion
  • 1 cup very thinly sliced white onion
  • 3/4 cup thinly sliced peeled Japanese cucumber or half-rounds of peeled English hothouse cucumber
  • 1/2 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup diced yellow bell pepper

Recipe Preparation

Dressing

  • Whisk first 6 ingredients in small bowl. Mix in celery and onion. Season with salt. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill.

Salad

  • Steam potatoes until tender, about 12 minutes. Transfer potatoes to large bowl; mash coarsely. Steam daikon and carrot until tender, about 5 minutes. Transfer to medium bowl. Mix 1 1/2 cups dressing into mashed potatoes. Cool to barely lukewarm.

  • Gently mix daikon, carrot, and remaining vegetables into potatoes. Season with salt and pepper.

Recipe by Delica rf 1 in San Francisco CAReviews Section

Japanese Potato Salad ポテトサラダ

Classic Japanese potato salad recipe. Made with mashed potato and colorful vegetables, Japanese potato salad is creamy yet full of textural crunch. If you’re a potato salad lover, you will be happy to add this delicious version into your repertoire.

What is Japanese Potato Salad ?

Potato salad is another import of western cuisine (known as yoshoku) that is highly embraced by the Japanese. The classic Japanese potato salad is made of mashed potato (leaving some chunks behind), sliced cucumbers and carrots, eggs and sometimes hams. The ingredients are not too different from the western version, but flavoring wise, the Japanese version is always seasoned with Japanese mayonnaise and sometimes rice vinegar.

There are a few variations based on your family’s taste, but it’s more standard than American potato salad varieties. The salad always includes a myriad of vegetables, which makes it healthier and visually eye-catching.

Most of the ingredients are easy to find in regular grocery stores. To make the salad uniquely Japanese, I highly recommend using Japanese mayonnaise which attributes a sweeter, richer creamy flavor. You can find Japanese mayo in Japanese and Asian grocery stores as well as Amazon (or substitute following my recipe here).

Just like the potato salads in the US, Japanese potato salad is also a popular party dish. You might also see it as a side dish in a bento lunch box, next to Karaage and Hambagu (Japanese hamburger steak). But of course, if you’re throwing a Japanese-theme BBQ, potluck or picnic, you will have to complete the menu with this classic Japanese Potato Salad.

Leftover Japanese Potato Salad?

My family loves potato salad so we actually don’t have much leftover. I usually make extra potato salad so that I can make this Potato Salad Pork Rolls (recipe here). Thinly sliced pork is wrapped around the potato salad and the teriyaki glaze goes really well with potato salad. This is a great example of the leftover turns into the main dish the next day.

Japanese Ingredient Substitution: If you want to look for substitutes for Japanese condiments and ingredients, click here.

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Japanese cucumber salad (Cucumber Sunomono)

Japanese cucumber salad known as &ldquoKyuri no Sunomono&rdquo in Japanese is a very refreshing, light, and delicious side dish. It is healthy dish consisting of thinly sliced cucumber and Wakame (a type of seaweed) that is marinated in rice vinegar, which is called &ldquosu&rdquo in Japanese.

Which Cucumber to Use?

The main ingredients of Japanese cucumber salad are cucumber, wakame seaweed, and vinegar. This is the perfect recipe for enjoying the refreshing-ness and crunchiness of cucumbers. So it is important to use the right cucumber. I was surprised that almost all vegetables are ginormous in size here compared to Japan. Those thick cucumbers are not good for this recipe. In Australia, the cucumber variety that I use is Vietnamese cucumber which are small cucumbers and close to what I get in Japan.

Preparing the Cucumbers

Slice the cucumbers into 2mm (0.078 inch) thick. Sprinkle salt in order to take the moisture out of the cucumbers. This is an important part of the process in order to not impair the flavour of the dish. Removing as much water out of the cucumbers allows the vinegar to absorb more into the cucumber. And this is why big cucumber does not suit for Japanese cucumber salad as it contains too much water. If that type of cucumber is all that&rsquos available, the seeds and centre of the cucumber need to be removed before it is sliced.

Wakame Seaweed

Wakame seaweed is often used as an ingredient in Japanese cucumber salad. They are available in dried form from any asian grocery stores or online. It absorbs water, so you only need a little bit like 1 tsp. Put the seaweed in cold water and leave it for 10 minutes. Squeeze the water out and cut them if necessary. Wakame seaweed can be replaced with cooked octopus bits, Shirasu ( juvenile sardines, sand lances, and herring), or Chirimen (dried shirasu).

&ldquoSu&rdquo the Vinegar

Commonly used vinegar in Japan is known as &ldquoSu&rdquo and it is usually referred to wheat, sake lees, rice and corn blended and brewed vinegar. Another generally available vinegar is &ldquoKome Su&rdquo which contains more than 40g of rice per 1 litre of the vinegar. Those two types are generally used to cook Japanese cucumber salad, salad dressings, pickles and Sushi in Japan. There is also Sushi vinegar that has the sugar and salt already mixed in to the vinegar. In Australia, I can get the same vinegar that I used to use in Japan from local Japanese grocery stores and the brand I use is Mitsukan (Mizkan).

Super fast, easy and healthy Japanese side dish

It&rsquos perfect as a small summer salad or side dish to any meal. This is also super easy to make, like unbelievably easy, you don&rsquot need anything special to make it and it you don&rsquot any sort of skill (just basic cutting skills)! It is low in calories and vegan.

If you liked my recipe for Japanese cucumber salad, please rate it and leave a comment below. Also, don&rsquot forget to follow me on Youtube, Pinterest, Facebook , Twitter and Instagram to keep up to date with all the latest happenings on Chopstick Chronicles. Don&rsquot forget to use the hashtag #ChopstickChronicles so I can see your wonderful creations!


Picnicking has been a popular pastime in Japan for centuries, dating back to ancient times when royal court members enjoyed dining alfresco below the flowering ume blossoms in spring. And while hanami season is still considered to be the most popular time in Japan to indulge in food, friends and family among nature’s scenery, all you really need is beautiful weather, a shaded tree, a light breeze, and the following selection of Japanese picnic food and drinks for an equally enjoyable outdoor reprieve.

Edamame

Edamame are young soybean pods that are steamed and lightly salted for a healthy snack that’s as fun to share as a bag of unshelled peanuts. While they’re available frozen year-round, it’s best to enjoy them in summertime at their peak freshness when they can be found in supermarkets, often still on the stem, and as appetizers in izakaya and traditional Japanese restaurants.

Kara-age

Fried chicken is a quintessential picnic food for many cultures, and Japan is no exception. Japanese-style fried chicken, called “kara-age,” is made with bite-size pieces of chicken marinated in soy sauce and ginger and coated in potato starch before deep-frying. It’s commonly eaten with Japanese mayonnaise and a fresh squeeze of lemon.

Sunomono

Sunomono are Japanese pickles made by dressing vegetables in a light rice vinegar-based vinaigrette. The most common variety is cucumber sunomono, but sunomono can be made with almost any vegetable including daikon (radish), wakame (seaweed), or goya (bitter melon), and even with some non-vegetable items like sliced octopus.

Rei-shabu

Rei-shabu is a cold dish of thinly sliced pork that’s lightly simmered shabu shabu-style, chilled, and served with a ponzu citrus dressing or sesame sauce (the two main dipping sauces used for shabu shabu). It’s a perfect way to enjoy this delicious winter dish during the heat of summer.

Tamagoyaki

A popular picnic food in Japan, Tamagoyaki is a Japanese-style rolled omelet that’s flavored with dashi and a bit of sugar for a richer and slightly sweeter flavor than Western-style omelets.

Korokke

Korokke are Japanese style potato croquettes, made with a mashed potato mixture that’s shaped into a round or oval patty, breaded with large flaky Japanese panko breadcrumbs, and deep-fried. Apart from the standard Hokkaido potato filling, korokke may also contain a savory cream filling (often crab or chicken) or a mixture of minced meat.

Morokyu (Cucumber with Miso)

Cucumbers are a popular summertime food in Japan thanks to their high water content and crisp, refreshing taste. Unlike Western cucumbers, Japanese cucumbers are much thinner, and have a more delicate skin that can be eaten as is without any peeling. One popular way to enjoy cucumber in the summertime is morokyu, or chilled cucumber with miso (soybean paste). The nutty flavor of the miso is a perfect match for the mild flavor of the cucumber.

Japanese Salads

Japanese cuisine includes many salad dishes and vegetable-based side dishes such as goma-ae, a type of salad tossed in sesame dressing ohitashi, blanched greens dressed in soy sauce and namasu, daikon radish and carrot pickled in vinegar.

In addition, potato salad, a Western picnic food, has been adopted as a popular picnic dish in Japan. Made with rich Japanese mayonnaise and a bit of sugar, the flavor has been modified to the Japanese palate for a slightly sweeter taste than Western-style potato salad and may include bits of diced ham, cucumber, and corn.

Onigiri

Onigiri rice balls are a favorite lunch box item in Japan and a popular picnic food. They’re made by shaping hot salted rice into a ball, cylinder, or triangle shape with an optional wrapping of toasted nori seaweed. Common fillings include salted salmon flakes, ume (pickled plum), and tuna salad.

Inarizushi

A type of sushi from western Japan, inarizushi consists of fried tofu pouches called “abura-age” stuffed with sushi rice. It keeps well at room temperature because it doesn’t include any raw fish, which makes it an excellent option for picnics.

Hiya-yakko

Hiya-yakko is a dish of creamy silken tofu that’s served chilled with a light soy sauce dressing. It’s typically garnished with freshly grated ginger, sliced spring onions, and bonito fish flakes.

Watermelon

Watermelon is one of the most popular summertime fruits in Japan, thanks to its high water content and ability to combat heat exhaustion. It’s grown throughout the country and varies in color from green to gold for the rind, while melon flesh ranges from ruby red to orange and even a light cream color. If you’re having a picnic on the beach, you can try a popular summer beach game called “suika-wari” in which players take turns trying to smash a watermelon with a stick while blindfolded as their friends call out directions.

Mugicha

Iced mugicha is a popular Japanese summertime drink that’s believed to prevent the effects of heat exhaustion. It’s made by steeping roasted barley in water, which results in an unsweetened, non-caffeinated tea-like drink that can be enjoyed by young and old alike as a healthy, refreshing beverage.

Simplify Your Japanese Picnic Food with a Pre-Made Bento Box

Japanese lunch boxes, known as “bento,” contain a variety of delicious, easy-to-share foods (like those listed above) packed in a portable container. Bento foods are specifically chosen for their ability to keep well at room temperature throughout the day, making them a perfect choice for any picnic. While they can be made at home, or purchased at supermarkets and bento specialty shops, the best Japanese bento can often be found outside of restaurants catering to patrons looking for a delicious lunch to go.

What better way is there to enjoy the outdoor beauty of Japan than with your favorite Japanese picnic food packed bento-style, a bottle of mugicha, and a few friends? For ideas on where to pick up a bento before your leisurely picnic, be sure to visit Gurunavi’s Bento Box listings!


A Colorful & Healthy Selection: Japanese Vegetable Side Dishes & Salads

Kinpira Gobo

Kinpira gobo is a sweet and earthy-tasting Japanese salad of braised gobo (burdock root) and carrot. It’s made by peeling and julienning the root vegetables into matchsticks, sauteeing them lightly in oil, and then simmering the vegetables with sugar, soy sauce, and mirin. This salad is a bento box favourite, and also appears commonly in teishoku meals. For a healthier version, the ingredients can be parboiled before frying, to reduce the amount of oil needed for cooking. Finely sliced chili peppers are also sometimes used to add heat to the dish–a perfect winter warmer!

Carrot & Daikon Namasu

Namasu is a category of raw Japanese salad made with uncooked vegetables and sweetened vinegar. Carrot and daikon namasu is a popular version known for the remarkable color contrast between its ingredients–the bright orange of the carrot and snow-white of the daikon. To prepare the dish, vegetables are julienned then marinated in a mixture of rice vinegar, sugar and salt for a few hours. This allows allow the sharp flavors of the daikon radish and vinegar to mellow, and the texture of the ingredients to soften.

Kiriboshi Daikon

Kiriboshi daikon is a Japanese vegetable dish of finely cut and dried (“kiriboshi”) daikon that’s reconstituted with in with ingredients such as aburaage (deep-fried and sweetened) tofu and finely sliced carrot, and dressed with a mixture of mirin, sugar, sake, dashi and soy sauce. Dried daikon is extremely healthy, providing a greater concentration of nutrients and vitamins than fresh daikon, and can be used for cooking year round.

Cucumber Sunomono

Sunomono is a broad term encompassing many types of Japanese foods pickled in vinegar (“su”). Cucumber sunomono is one of the most popular types, which also often comes mixed with kombu seaweed. To make sunomono, fresh cucumber is thinly sliced and squeezed dry, then pickled in a light vinaigrette of rice vinegar, soy sauce, and a bit of sugar. This is a very refreshing and delicate dish that can be served along many types of meals, and is a summertime favorite.

Horensou No Goma-ae

Goma-ae is a type of Japanese vegetable dish where vegetables are blanched and then dressed with a sesame dressing. This dish is typically served chilled or at room temperature. To make horensou no goma-ae, fresh spinach is blanched, cooled, and squeezed of excess liquid, then mixed with sesame dressing. This nutty, creamy and savory salad is a tasty Japanese twist on a spinach salad.

Hijiki Carrot Salad

Hijiki is a wild variety of seaweed that grows on Japan’s rocky coastlines. Although largely unknown outside of Japan, hijiki has been an integral ingredient of the Japanese diet for many centuries, and is very high in vitamins and minerals. Hijiki is sold boiled and dried and needs to be reconstituted with water before cooking. It’s simmered with thinly sliced carrot, aburaage tofu, lotus root, and konnyaku in dashi with a little mirin rice wine and soy sauce, then cooled and served at room temperature.

Potato Salad

While potato salad may seem like the quintessential Western salad, it’s also a popular dish in Japan. Japanese potato salad has a distinct flavor that’s noticeably different from Western potato salad, with more umami flavor and a touch of sweetness. The secret ingredient is Japanese mayonnaise, which has a thicker texture and richer flavor than Western mayo. Japanese potato salad may also include other unusual ingredients like diced ham and cucumber.

Okra Aemono

Aemono to a type of Japanese vegetable dish dressed with an uncooked dressing, and is a popular preparation technique in Japan. Okra is a popular vegetable Japan, enjoyed for its unusual slimy texture and many health benefits. To make okra aemono, okra is diced, then seasoned with soy sauce and bonito flakes. The naturally sticky texture of the okra mixes with the soy sauce to create a delicious coating with a unique texture.

Komatsuna Ohitashi

Ohitashi is another popular preparation technique for Japanese vegetable side dishes that features blanched green vegetables such as asparagus, okra, spinach and komatsuna, native Japanese mustard greens. The sliced and blanched komatsuna is dressed lightly in a mixture of dashi, soy sauce, and mirin. The dish is typically garnished with bonito flakes.


How to Make Japanese Potato Salad:

Place the carrots in a microwave-safe bowl and cover with water (or steam on the stove). Microwave for 2 1/2 minutes on high and drain, stopping to check every 30 seconds. Test to see if they are soft enough before draining.

Next, place the cucumber slices in a bowl and sprinkle with salt. (This will extract the liquid, leaving the cucumber nice and crunchy). After 5 – 10 minutes, rinse the cucumber thoroughly 2-3 times to remove all the salt. Squeeze them gently to remove any excess water and pat dry with a paper towel.

Add the bacon in a frying pan over medium high heat and fry until cooked. Remove from the heat and allow to cool.

Bring the potato pieces to the boil in a large saucepan and cook until tender. Remove from the heat and drain and allow to cool slightly. Place the potato in a mixing bowl and mash gently with a fork to retain texture.

Add in the cucumber, carrot and stir through the potatoes. Add the bacon (set aside 1-2 tsp for garnish), egg, salt & pepper to season and finally – the star of the show – Kewpie mayonnaise. Combine everything carefully without breaking up the egg too much.

Garnish with bacon pieces and an optional drizzle of extra Kewpie serve immediately or pop in the fridge, covered, until ready.


Japanese-Style Potato Salad with Daikon and Cucumber - Recipes


Ingredients
Dressing
1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
1/4 cup finely chopped celery
1/4 cup finely chopped white onion

2 3/4 pounds russet potatoes (about 4 very large), peeled, sliced into 1/2-inch-thick rounds
1 2-inch-long piece daikon (Japanese white radish),* peeled, halved lengthwise, cut crosswise into 1/8-inch-thick slices
1 large carrot, peeled, cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds

8 large escarole leaves, torn into 1-inch pieces
1 cup very thinly sliced red onion
1 cup very thinly sliced white onion
3/4 cup thinly sliced peeled Japanese cucumber or half-rounds of peeled English hothouse cucumber
1/2 cup diced red bell pepper
1/2 cup diced yellow bell pepper

Preparation
For dressing: Whisk first 6 ingredients in small bowl. Mix in celery and onion. Season with salt. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover chill.)

For salad: Steam potatoes until tender, about 12 minutes. Transfer potatoes to large bowl mash coarsely. Steam daikon and carrot until tender, about 5 minutes. Transfer to medium bowl. Mix 1 1/2 cups dressing into mashed potatoes. Cool to barely lukewarm.

Gently mix daikon, carrot, and remaining vegetables into potatoes. Season with salt and pepper.

*Available at some supermarkets and at Asian markets.

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Site Updated November 2008

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The trick to a lovely potato salad is to make sure there is no excess liquid. And here are some of my tips to achieve this:

  1. Pan dry boiled potatoes and carrots to remove excess liquid. Stop once you see the potato becomes slightly powdery.
  2. Sprinkle cucumber and onion with salt, massage gently, and let rest until you see some liquid coming out from them, then gently squeeze dry.

If you follow these tips, your potato salad will not be runny at all.

Potato salad is great as is, or you can spread this on bread and make potato salad sandwiches. Many Japanese bento boxes also include potato salad, so be sure to make this when you plan on having a full-course Japanese meal in your home. ♥


Ingredients

1 1/2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into half-inch dice

1 Persian cucumber or 1/3 hothouse cucumber

1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard

2 teaspoons distilled white vinegar, plus more to taste as needed

2 ajitama eggs, halved (recipe follows)


Japanese Cucumber Salad

A crisp, cool and refreshing salad! The pure beauty of this salad will have your guest speechless.

Ingredients

  • 1 whole Daikon (Japanese Radish), Thinly Sliced
  • 1 whole English Cucumber, Thinly Sliced
  • 1-¼ Tablespoon Salt, Divided
  • 3-½ cups Water, Divided
  • ½ cups Rice Vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Fresh Ginger, Grated
  • 8 ounces, weight Imitation Krab Meat
  • 8 ounces, weight Cooked Shrimp, Butterflied
  • 2 teaspoons Black Sesame Seeds

Preparation

1. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the outer skin from the daikon (radish).

2. Use a mandoline, food processor or sharp knife to slice the radish and cucumber into very thin slices.

3. Place the vegetables in a bowl with 1 tablespoon salt and 3 cups water. Let soak in saltwater for 10 minutes then drain and squeeze gently to remove the excess water.

4. Combine the vinegar, remaining 1/2 cup water, sugar, ginger and the remaining 1/4 tablespoon salt in a medium bowl, whisk well to dissolve.

5. Place the cucumbers and radish is a serving dish, top with the krab meat and shrimp, pour the dressing over the entire dish and sprinkle with the black sesame seeds.