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3 Best Kapusta Recipes

3 Best Kapusta Recipes

If you love this traditional Polish cabbage dish, try these variations

Kapusta can be used for everything from soup to pierogi.

Kapusta (the polish word for “cabbage”) is a traditional Polish dish made from braised cabbage or sauerkraut (kapusta kiszona or “sour cabbage”). Some kapusta is served with an ample amount of liquid (like a soup) while other varieties are cooked for a longer period of time so that the liquids reduce and the dish thickens. Here are three of the best ways to cook kapusta.

Kielbasa and Cabbage
This flavorful kapusta dish is so easy to make. Toss cut-up kielbasa, potatoes, and shredded cabbage into a pot with water, salt, and pepper and let it simmer away until everything is tender and delicious.
Click here for the recipe.

Sauerkraut Salad
An easy way to prepare kapusta kiszona (sauerkraut) this salad takes just minutes to prepare. Toss the sauerkraut with the fruit and herbs then refrigerate overnight.
Click here for the recipe.

Traditional Kapusta
It’s tough to beat tradition. This basic preparation is easy to make and the longer you simmer the dish, the better it will taste. If you omit the sausage, it would make a great filling for pierogi.
Click here for the recipe.

Kristie Collado is The Daily Meal’s Cook Editor. Follow her on Twitter @KColladoCook.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.


Kapusta can be thick, like mashed potatoes, or runny, like a soup. It could be thickened with flour, or not. It could be seasoned with paprika, or bay, or dill, or sugar, or just simply salt and pepper. It could include tomatoes, potatoes, mushrooms, onions, or some form of pork.

You&rsquore starting to get the picture.

Kapusta doesn&rsquot even have to start off with cabbage. Well, it doesn&rsquot actually have to start off with fresh cabbage. Some cooks use sauerkraut as the base for their kapusta, while others use a mixture of half sauerkraut and half fresh cabbage.

The real confusion comes in because, while each of these preparations may have their own proper (long) name, (kapusta kiszona, for example, is the actual Polish term for sauerkraut), it is quite common to hear all of them simply referred to as &lsquokapusta&rsquo.