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Road Trips for the Food Obsessed

Road Trips for the Food Obsessed

You're more than a foodie, you're a food nerd. Everything you do leads up to the perfect bite, so no ordinary road trip will satisfy you. Instead, here are some novel ways to pay homage to your favorite foods, from sea to shining sea.

It turns out there are more than 30 cities across the U.S. with food names, from the curious Cheddar, South Carolina (we thought it came from Vermont?), to the classic summer spot, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, wherein lies a town called Sandwich — a food-city roadtrip double whammy.

It's possible to start on the West Coast, in Orange, California, or White Salmon, Washington, and then head across the Lower 48, hitting 20 states in one go. Not up for the long haul? Stay in Texas, which has four food-named cities (Oatmeal, Raisin, Mesquite and Rice) or take a fun mini-trip based on a theme. Imagine getting photos of six fruit town signs or an entire breakfast of city limits signage. Check out these road trip ideas:

Breakfast Foods Road Trip

If you love breakfast for supper and greasy spoon diners.

Pancake, Pennsylvannia

Bacon, Missouri

Ham Lake, Minnesota

Two Egg, Florida

Toast, North Carolina

Oatmeal, Texas

Coffeeville, Mississppi

Fruit Road Trip

A perfect summertime road trip.

Orange, California

Raisin, Texas

Citrus Park, Florida

Plum, Pennsylvannia

Cherry Valley, Ohio

Fruitvale, Colorado

Dessert Road Trip

For the road-warrior with a sweet tooth.

Pie, West Virginia

Coffeeville, Missouri

Cookietown, Oklahoma

Tea, South Dakota

Cocoa Beach, Florida

Meat Lovers' Road Trip

Calling all carnivores... this is the one to do by motorcycle.

Bacon Flat, Ohio

Bacon, Indiana

Mesquite, Texas

Rabbit Hash, Kentucky

Ham Lake, Minnesota

Hamburg, Minnesota

Sandwich, New Hampshire

Rib Mountain, Wisconsin

(Chicken, Alaska, for the truly obssessed)

Fisherman's Road Trip

Hang up that Gone Fishin' sign before you leave.

Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Fish Springs, Tennessee

Oyster Bay, New York

White Salmon, Washington

Troutdale, Oregon

Check out the map below for all of the cities with food names.

View Food Cities Road Trip in a larger map


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

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I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

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Join Yoga Journal

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I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

Share this

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

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Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

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Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

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Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

Share this

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

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I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

Share this

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

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I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

Share this

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

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I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

Share this

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

Share this

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

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Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.


3 Road-Trip-Ready Recipes for Your Summer Vacation

Share this

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

Join Yoga Journal

Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites.

I eat well in everyday life. I don’t mean well in a green-smoothie-for-breakfast-everyday sort of way, but I enjoy lots of fresh vegetables and greens, whole grains, beans, and the occasional chips and queso at happy hour. When eating well has become a basic habit, it’s easy to take abundant energy for granted. Every time I travel, though, I’m reminded just how much my food choices affect my energy (and my mood).

I recently travelled to Morocco for a yoga retreat with Abbi Miller. It was dreamy, and exactly the break that I needed after devoting over a year and a half to my cookbook. I booked an extra four days to travel on my own afterward. Morocco was everything I’d hoped it would be. It was colorful, fascinating, historical, and at times, overwhelming. I struggled sometimes to find lasting sustenance, though—white bread, couscous, and stewed vegetables were the standard options.

On the seven-hour train ride from Marrakech to Fez (and back), I got by on a big bag of salted peanuts. I like peanuts, but during those long train rides, I daydreamed about all the snacks I wished I had with me instead. The trail mix granola bites in my cookbook came to mind. They’re super easy to make, and the combination of oats, nuts, and honey create a remarkably filling snack that tastes like a treat. They’re also great before or after yoga class, when I’m running low on energy. Sometimes they even count as breakfast when I’m running late.

My favorite chickpea salad (in the book as well) packs great for barbecues, lunches, road trips, flights—or train rides. Another delicious option I was dreaming about: my kale and quinoa salad with crisp celery, plumped cranberries and lemon dressing. Kale and quinoa might set off the too-healthy alarm bells, but trust me, this salad is completely irresistible. My dog, Cookie, begs for the leftovers! If you’re packing a salad for later, just be sure to use a leak-proof container, and remember to bring a fork.

Other fun and filling snacks for trips include basics like fruit (apples, bananas, and grapes), nuts, granola (homemade is more affordable and tastes so much better!), and hummus with veggies or pita chips. Those are all way more nutritious and satisfying than fast food or gas station fare. We all know how stressful traveling can be, but it’s always better to arrive well-fed.