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Hooters Logo Revamped

Hooters Logo Revamped

The double-Os still stand, however

Hooters has debuted a new look for their owl.

Wendy's isn't the only girl in town who got a makeover; Hooter's iconic owl "Hootie" has just come out with a new look, and the new owl is much leaner than the old.

For 30 years, the scruffy, oldish owl has been the face of the restaurant, known for "nice girls walking around in nice outfits," as one customer puts it for USA Today. Apparently, 30 years ago the company traced the owl from a dictionary when they couldn't find a logo for the brand. The new logo will be applied to all future remodeled locations,a press release says.

"We wanted to give 'Hootie' a facelift along with the stores," Dave Henninger, chief marketing officer, told USA Today, noting the new contemporary restaurant redesign introduced earlier this year.

And while the owl is much sleeker, those double O's are still as raunchy as ever, as the sexual imagery lingers. "The (visual) double entendre remains in place," says Henninger. "We want to keep the tongue-in-cheek wink going."


Hooters revamps its look, aims to be a family restaurant

The best-known breastaurant of them all, Hooters of America, is turning 30 this year. High time for a makeover, the company said.

Hooters is remodeling one of its stores in Houston with hopes that the design will serve as a prototype for future locations.

The Atlanta-based company is notorious for using bosomy young women in tank tops and skin-tight orange shorts as servers and for inspiring similar hormone-charged restaurants such as Tilted Kilt, Twin Peaks and the Heart Attack Grill. There are 435 Hooters in 44 states and 28 foreign countries.

The new look involves “sleek and contemporary finishes” a high ceiling, painted ductwork, bright cypress wood walls and light-colored brick, the company said. There will also be new booth seating and high-back chairs “with an enhanced seat size and added padding.”

The hope, according to Hooters Chief Marketing Officer Dave Henniger, is that customers view the revamped store as “the ideal environment to kick back and relax after work, get together to watch their favorite sports team and enjoy a delicious meal with their family.”

After all, there’s nothing like barely concealed cleavage to perk up dinner with the kids.


Sexual Ornament or Invitation to Harassment at Hooters Bar? : Lawsuits: A lawyer for several former waitresses calls it a ‘corporate culture of misogyny.’ But the chain’s attorneys and officials say they are only marketing ‘sex appeal.’

Former waitress Whitney Miller remembers the customer who refused to pay for his food--unless she took off her shirt.

That, he thought, “was what Hooters was for.”

Was he mistaken? A growing number of critics of Hooters, a chain of bar-restaurants, would say he was right on the money.

They say Hooters’ success--107 franchises in 28 states and annual sales in excess of $150 million--is built on a corporate image that uses women employees as sexual ornaments and, according to recent lawsuits, encourages unwelcome sexual advances by customers and managers.

One lawyer who has filed sexual harassment lawsuits on behalf of former Hooters waitresses calls it a “corporate culture of misogyny.”

Protests have been launched in Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio and Virginia. The National Organization for Women has raised objections, and Working Woman magazine inducted Hooters into its 1992 Hall of Shame.

Like many other bars, Hooters features waitresses--"Hooters Girls"--in scanty costumes, taking orders for beer and chicken wings.

But Hooters attorneys and company officials deny that they’re marketing anything more than innocent “sex appeal.” The lawsuits are “outrageous,” they say.

And the name? It’s not a double-entendre reference to women’s breasts, Hooters’ management says. It’s about owls.

“For us, Hooters is just the name of the restaurant,” said Mike McNeil, vice president of marketing for Hooters of America Inc., in Atlanta. “If that was our desire, to blatantly name it after a portion of the female anatomy, there are much more blatant slang terms that we could utilize.”

No question. When the original Hooters opened in Clearwater, Fla., in 1983, it inspired several competitors: Knockers, Melons, and Mugs ‘n’ Jugs.

Seven harassment lawsuits have been filed by former waitresses at the Hooters bar in the Mall of America, the giant shopping and entertainment complex in the Minneapolis suburb of Bloomington. Another sexual harassment lawsuit was filed in early July in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., by a former Hooters waitress.

At the heart of the lawsuits is the argument that Hooters’ “concept"--waitresses in scanty costumes, nod-and-a-wink references to women’s anatomy, cheesecake calendars and swimsuit photo magazines featuring “Hooters Girls"--invites sexual harassment of women employees.

That harassment, the Minnesota lawsuits say, included Hooters’ managers and other employees grabbing and propositioning women employees and commenting about their breasts. One of plaintiffs, Dawn Felepe, said she was propositioned by Hooters managers at least 50 times in the nine months she worked there.

Customers also felt free to make sexual comments, the lawsuits say. Some waitresses said they were asked if they wore underwear. Others were asked their bra size. Others were simply asked for sex.

Managers told them to tolerate it, the women say.

Miller, one of the plaintiffs, said managers told her she shouldn’t work as a “Hooters Girl” anymore because her breasts became smaller after she stopped breast-feeding her son.

As a 25-year-old single mother, Miller worked six months at Hooters to support her son. Her attorney, Lori Peterson of Minneapolis, said Hooters offered her the job before the restaurant opened and wasn’t candid about the requirements.

“I now realize that no amount of money is worth being a sexual target because I’m female,” Miller said, when the lawsuits were filed.

Lisa Gray, Hooters’ attorney in Minneapolis, said the lawsuits contain “outrageous and inflammatory allegations that are clearly written for press consumption.” McNeil denies that the Hooters concept degrades women.

“Hooters Girls in our concept are put on pedestals,” he said. “We treat them like a celebrity. We even put them on Hooters Girl trading cards.”

Still, the first thing that greets visitors to the restaurants is the Hooters logo, an owl whose enormous, round orange eyes form the O’s in “hooters” and look like line-drawing representations of breasts.

This is how the Hooters menu explains the name: “The dilemma . . . what to name the place. Simple--what else brings a gleam to men’s eyes everywhere besides beer and chicken wings and an occasional winning football season. Hence, the name Hooters.”

Some Hooters restaurants have also used the slogan “More than a mouthful” on T-shirts worn by waitresses. McNeil said it’s not the company’s official slogan, and some restaurants have stopped using it.

At the Mall of America Hooters, some waitresses--there are no waiters--wear form-fitting hot-orange jogging shorts. Some wear T-shirts cropped at the midriff others pull shirts taut. A few wear looser T-shirts tucked into roomier shorts. The women are required to wear shorts, even in winter, while male employees--managers and cooks--are allowed to wear long pants.

One “Hooters Girl” at the Mall of America said the uniforms are comfortable, the money good, the co-workers and customers friendly. “I’ve never been harassed,” said Amy Calvin, 20, a psychology student.

Her customers have no illusions, and make no apologies. “I’m a guy. What can I say,” Dave Johnson, 29, of Newington, Conn., said, shrugging.

And company managers say they’re not about to start hiring Hooters Boys.

Said McNeil: “When you get a concept that works as well as this one does . . . you don’t want to change where you put the salt and pepper shakers, let alone something as essential to the concept as the Hooters Girls.”


Hooters launches new logo

Sky Design updates the politically incorrect chain's 30-year-old logo - what do you think of it?

Hooters is one of the US's top brands and is a peculiarly American institution - a restaurant chain where a mainstream customer base, including families with children, are served buffalo wings and chilli dogs by female staff recruited largely on the basis of their vital statistics. Much like the concept itself, the company's logo design (below) served for 30 years as an example of a design that shouldn't work, but does. Now, though, Hooters has decided the time has come to update it.

Atlanta design firm Sky Design has given the logo a more modern streamlined look (above), although the essential details remain, including the cartoon typography, the owl and the double-entendre use of the bird's eyes.

As part of the design process, different owl designs were presented to 300 consumers, and the one chosen was preferred roughly nine to one over the old design. Over the next few months the logo will be rolled out across the brand, appearing on waitress uniforms, menus and, eventually signage.


The airline was established in 2003 and started operations on March 6, 2003. It was founded by Hooters of America restaurant owner Robert Brooks, who acquired Pace Airlines in December 2002. [1] All flights were operated by Pace Airlines. Hooters Air was owned by Hooters of America, Inc. Brooks initially envisioned Hooters Air as an unconventional means of generating awareness for the Hooters restaurant brand [2] the carrier was sometimes referred to as a "flying billboard" for the restaurant chain.

Aside from its unorthodox neighborhood chain-restaurant tie-in, Hooters Air sought to differentiate itself from other carriers with a distinctive style of in-flight service. The carrier was marketed towards golfers in an effort to bring casual and tournament players to Myrtle Beach's 100+ championship golf courses. Two "Hooters Girls," dressed in their restaurant uniforms, were on each flight assisting the (traditionally attired) in-flight crews with hospitality duties. The company advertised nonstop flights for most routes, including funny slogans like "Fly a mile high with us." Although Hooters Air billed itself as a low-fare carrier, rows of seats were removed from the aircraft to provide a 34-inch (86 cm) seating pitch to all passengers, comparable to the legroom offered by many carriers' business classes in keeping with the golf-friendly orientation of the carrier, this was called "Club Class" seating. Additionally, all seats were upholstered in dark blue or black leather, and all aircraft were painted in Hooters' orange and white company colors featuring the company logo, and mascot ("Hootie the Owl"), on the vertical stabilizer. Also, at a time when many low-cost carriers were eliminating in-flight frills in an effort to curtail expenses, Hooters Air served complimentary meals to all customers on trips lasting over one hour. [ citation needed ]

On December 8, 2005, Hooters announced that it would end service to Rockford, Illinois on January 5, 2006, as a result of the airport authority's bringing in a competing airline (United Airlines) on its Rockford-Denver route, and providing revenue guarantees for the competitor.

All commercial services were suspended on January 9, 2006. Parent company Pace Airlines continued with charter services for another three years, ceasing operations in September 2009. [1] On April 17, 2006, Hooters Air ceased operations, halting scheduled Public Charter service and refunding tickets. The company attributed this cessation of service primarily to a marked increase in fuel costs in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the autumn of 2005.

The airline is estimated to have cost Hooters of America $40 million. [3]


Contents

Hooters, Inc., was incorporated in Clearwater, Florida, on April 1, 1983, by six Clearwater businessmen: Lynn D. Stewart, Gil DiGiannantonio, Ed Droste, Billy Ranieri, Ken Wimmer and Dennis Johnson. The date was an April Fools' Day joke because the original six owners believed that their prospect was going to fail. Their first Hooters restaurant was built on the site of a former rundown nightclub that had been purchased at a low price. So many businesses had folded in that particular location that the Hooters founders built a small "graveyard" at the front door for each that had come and gone before them. The first restaurant opened its doors on October 4, 1983, in Clearwater. [9] This original location was decorated with memorabilia from Waverly, Iowa, hometown to some of the original Hooters 6.

In 1984, Hugh Connerty bought the rights to Hooters from the Original Hooters 6. Robert H. Brooks and a group of Atlantan investors (operators of Hooters of America, Inc.) bought out Hugh Connerty. In 2002, Brooks bought majority control and became chairman. [10] The Clearwater-based company retained control over restaurants in the Tampa Bay Area, Chicago metropolitan area, and one in Manhattan, New York, [11] while all other locations were under the aegis of Hooters of America, which sold franchising rights to the rest of the United States and international locations. [12] Under Brooks's leadership, the collective Hooters brand expanded to more than 425 stores worldwide. Brooks died on July 15, 2006, in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, of a heart attack. [13] Brooks's will gave most of Hooters of America Inc. to his son Coby Brooks and daughter Boni Belle Brooks. [14] [ dead link ]

The Hooters Casino Hotel was opened February 2, 2006, off the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada. This hotel has 696 rooms with a 35,000-square-foot (3,300 m 2 ) casino. The hotel is owned and operated by 155 East Tropicana, LLC. It is adjacent to the Tropicana, across the street from the MGM Grand Las Vegas. As of 2014, it is the only Hooters facility offering lodging since a Hooters Inn motel located along Interstate 4 in Lakeland, Florida, was demolished in 2007.

As part of their 25th anniversary, Hooters Magazine released its list of top Hooters Girls of all time. Among the best-known were Lynne Austin (the original Hooters Girl), the late Kelly Jo Dowd (the mother of the golfer Dakoda Dowd), Bonnie-Jill Laflin, Leeann Tweeden, and Holly Madison. [15] [16]

After Brooks' death in 2006, 240 buyers showed interest in Hooters of America Inc., and 17 submitted bids, with that number being reduced to eight, and then three, before the selection of Wellspring Capital Management. [14] Chanticleer Holdings LLC of Charlotte, North Carolina, which had the right to block the sale after a $5 million loan made in 2006, did so in a December 1, 2010, letter to the court. As a result, Chanticleer and other investors bought the company from the Brooks Family [17] [18]

In January 2011, Chanticleer Holdings LLC of Charlotte, North Carolina and others completed the purchase of Hooters of America Inc. from the Brooks family. [19]

As of July 2013 [update] , Hooters of America owns 160 restaurants and operates or franchises over 430. [20]

On July 1, 2019, Hooters was sold to Nord Bay Capital and TriArtisan Capital Advisors. Full details of the sale were not disclosed, what was disclosed is, the Hooters' previous owners, Chanticleer Holdings and H.I.G. Capital, will both retain stakes in the casual-dining chain. [21] [22]

Restaurant remodel Edit

In 2013, the company announced a plan to remodel every restaurant in the chain. The prototype restaurant first remodeled was the location in Houston, Texas, located off the Southwest Freeway at Kirby Drive near Downtown Houston. The new design (done by ASD|skydesign [23] ) will feature more windows and outdoor dining and upgraded audio-visual systems to better appeal to sports enthusiasts. The first completely redesigned Hooters opened in New Orleans in July 2013. The company also announced changes to its menu, such as the addition of entrée salads. [24]

Hoots restaurant Edit

The Original Hooters company [25] has created a fast casual spinoff of its format called Hoots. [26] Hoots is distinguished from its original concept primarily by a reduction in menu items and employment of both male and female servers, modestly dressed in t-shirts and khakis. [27] As of 2019 [update] , there are Hoots locations in Cicero, Chicago and St. Petersburg, with a second Chicago location planned to open during 2020. [28]

The appearance of the waitresses is a main selling feature of the restaurant. A Hooters Girl is a waitress employed by the Hooters restaurant chain, and they are recognizable by their uniform of a white tank top with the "Hootie the Owl" logo and the location name on the front paired with short nylon orange runner's shorts. The remainder of the Hooters Girls uniform consists of the restaurant's brown ticket pouch (or a black one with the black uniform), tan pantyhose, [30] white loose socks, and clean white shoes. Men who work at Hooters wear Hooters hats, T-shirts with long pants, Bermuda shorts, or attire more suitable for kitchen use. [31]

Employee handbook requirements Edit

An older version of the Hooters Employee Handbook (prior to October 2006), published in The Smoking Gun reads: [31]

Customers can go to many places for wings and beer, but it is our Hooters Girls who make our concept unique. Hooters offers its customers the look of the "All American Cheerleader, Surfer, Girl Next Door."

Female employees are required to sign that they "acknowledge and affirm" the following:

  1. My job duties require I wear the designated Hooters Girl uniform.
  2. My job duties require that I interact with and entertain the customers.
  3. The Hooters concept is based on female sex appeal and the work environment is one in which joking and entertaining conversations are commonplace.

Legal history Edit

In 1997, three men from the Chicago area sued Hooters after being denied employment at an Orland Park, Illinois, restaurant. Each of them was awarded $19,100. Four men who filed a similar lawsuit in Maryland received $10,350 each. The settlement allows Hooters to continue attracting customers with its female staff of Hooters Girls. The chain agreed to create other support jobs, like bartenders and hosts, that must be filled without regard to gender. [32]

In 2001, a jury determined Hooters of Augusta Inc. willfully violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by sending unsolicited advertising faxes. The class-action lawsuit, brought in June 1995 by Sam Nicholson, included 1,320 others who said they received the advertising faxes from Hooters. Atlanta-based Hooters of America Inc., the local restaurant's parent company, paid out $11 million. [33] The jury determined that six faxes were sent to each plaintiff. With a $500 fine for each, that amounts to a $3,000 award per plaintiff. [34]

Also in 2001, Jodee Berry, a waitress at a Hooters in Panama City Beach, Florida won a beer sales contest, for which the promised prize was a new Toyota automobile. However, the manager awarded her a "toy Yoda" instead, claiming the contest was an April Fool's Day joke. Berry filed a lawsuit against Gulf Coast Wings, the local franchisee, and later reached a settlement. [35]

In 2004, it was found that job applicants to a Hooters in West Covina, California, were secretly filmed while undressing, prompting a civil suit filed against the national restaurant chain in Los Angeles Superior Court. [36] The company addressed the incident with additional employee training.

In 2009, Nikolai Grushevski, a man from Corpus Christi, Texas, filed a lawsuit because Hooters would not hire him as a waiter. Grushevski and Hooters reached a confidential settlement on April 13. [37] In September 2009, the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against a North Carolina charter airline (formerly Hooters Air, owned by Hooters of America) on behalf of Chau Nguyen, an Asian flight attendant fired three years prior after complaining only white workers were being promoted. [38]

In May 2010, a lawsuit was filed against Hooters in Michigan after an employee was given a job performance review and was told that her shirt and short size could use some improvement by two women who held positions at the headquarters in Atlanta. Michigan is the only state that includes height and weight as bounds for non-discrimination in hiring. The plaintiff alleges that she was made the offer of a free gym membership and told that if she did not improve in 30 days, her employment would be terminated. [39] The company denied that they threatened to fire the plaintiffs, and the suit was settled out of court. [40]

In December 2010, as part of the settlement of Robert H. Brooks' estate, a judge in Horry County, South Carolina approved the sale of Hooters of America Inc. to Wellspring Capital Management. The decision did not prevent Charlotte, North Carolina–based Chanticleer Investors LLC from exercising "the right of first refusal" given to Chanticleer in a loan agreement with Hooters. [14]

In 2011, a number of former Hooters executives left to start a Twin Peaks franchise group. Hooters filed suit and alleged that former Hooters executives stole trade secrets and management documents as part as their move to the new restaurant chain. [41] In 2012, former employee Jheri Stratton filed suit after catching the airborne disease tuberculosis from one of her managers. [42] [43]

In 2012 Kisuk Cha, a Korean American immigrant who placed a takeout order at a Hooters in Queens, New York, sued the restaurant chain for racial discrimination after noticing a racial slur printed on a cash register receipt by a hostess who later confessed and subsequently resigned. As of April 2, 2015 (as a result of the Farryn Johnson racial discrimination lawsuit), the case has not been resolved. [44]

On April 2, 2015, former employee Farryn Johnson was awarded $250,000 after an arbitrator found that racial discrimination contributed to her termination. Johnson was terminated in August 2013 after her store manager (from the Hooters in Baltimore, Maryland) told her that she could not have blonde highlights in her hair. Johnson filed a civil rights complaint with the State of Maryland Civil Rights Division where her attorneys stated the applicability of the dress code for African Americans and everyone else (e.g. non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanic/Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander American) where one set of policies pertains to a certain group of people was considered as racial discrimination. A statement from Hooters of America by Ericka Whitaker (Hooters of America senior brand manager) stated that she had no issue of having blonde highlights as a Hooters Girl prior to becoming a brand manager and the company will continue to diversify its employees, from the restaurant to the annual Hooters International Swimsuit Pageant. [45] [46] [47]

Legal status Edit

In employment discrimination law in the United States, employers are generally allowed to consider characteristics that would otherwise be discriminatory if they are bona fide occupational qualifications (BFOQ). For example, a manufacturer of men's clothing may lawfully advertise for male models. Hooters has argued a BFOQ defense, which applies when the "essence of the business operation would be undermined if the business eliminated its discriminatory policy". [37]

Feminists are usually against Hooters concept and made protests against the company. [48]

Charitable activities Edit

Hooters has actively supported charities through its Hooters Community Endowment Fund, also known as HOO.C.E.F., a play on UNICEF. It has provided money and/or volunteers to charities such as Habitat for Humanity, The V Foundation for Cancer Research, Operation Homefront, Make-A-Wish Foundation, Special Olympics, Muscular Dystrophy Association and Stop Hunger Now. [49] [50] In addition, after the 2007 death of Kelly Jo Dowd, a former Hooters Girl, Hooters calendar cover girl and later restaurant general manager, Hooters began a campaign in support of breast cancer research, with awareness of the issue being spread through the Kelly Jo Dowd Fund. By 2010 the chain raised over $2 million for the cause. [51]

In 2009, Hooters partnered with Operation Homefront to establish The Valentine Fund in honor of fallen soldier SOCS Thomas J. Valentine. The fund supports the families of US Special Forces service members and other military families. Thomas J. Valentine, a Navy SEAL troop chief, was killed during a training exercise February 13, 2008. He left behind his wife, Christina, and two young children. Hooters established a fund in Valentine's name through Operation Homefront. [52] [53]

Athletics and promotions Edit

Hooters is involved in the sports world. Previous sponsorships include the Miami Hooters, a now defunct Arena Football League team. Hooters formerly sponsored the USAR Hooters Pro Cup, an automobile racing series, and the NGA Pro Golf Tour, a minor league golf tour.

In 1992, Hooters sponsored NASCAR driver Alan Kulwicki as he won the Winston Cup Championship, beating Bill Elliott by ten points, the closest margin in NASCAR prior to The Chase era. On April 1, 1993 Kulwicki, along with several others including Hooters Chairman Bob Brooks' son Mark were killed in a plane crash near Bristol, Tennessee. They were flying back to the track for Sunday's race after making a sponsor appearance at a Hooters in Knoxville, Tennessee. Hooters remained in the sport, sponsoring drivers like Loy Allen Jr., Rick Mast and Brett Bodine before ending their involvement in 2003. The restaurant returned to NASCAR in 2007 to sponsor a Craftsman Truck Series team led by Jason White, Derrike Cope and Brad Keselowski. Six years later, Hooters sponsored Nationwide Series driver Nelson Piquet Jr.'s car. [54] For the 2016 Bojangles' Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway, Hooters made a comeback in the Cup Series with a one-off paint scheme for Greg Biffle. [55] Hooters currently sponsors the No. 9 of Chase Elliott. [56]

Hooters has sponsored the Major League Eating-sanctioned "Hooters Worldwide Wing Eating Championship" since 2012. [57] Hooters has also licensed its name for the Hooters Road Trip PlayStation racing game as well as a Hooters Calendar mobile wallpaper application. Oasys Mobile will also be putting out several other games for mobile consumption based on the Hooters Calendar license in 2008. [58] It was also one of several real world brands that appeared in the 2011 video game Homefront.

Since 1986, the restaurant has issued a calendar featuring Hooters Girls, with signings taking place in some of their restaurants. Since 1996, Hooters has held Miss Hooters International Swimsuit Pageant, a competition of Hooters Girls from around the world in 2010, this event took place in Hollywood, Florida. An African-American woman won the Miss Hooters pageant for the first time in 2010: LeAngela Davis of Columbus, Ohio. [59]


TGI Friday's

Plenty of people look forward to Fridays, but maybe not in the way that TGI Friday's would want. Sales for the chain dropped 1.1 percent in 2015, and 2.7 percent in 2016, showing that they too are not immune to the threat of fast-casual and the decline of shopping malls. In order to stay afloat and ideally become more profitable, the company is trying to rebrand itself as a trendy gastropub they're redesigning to make the bar more prominent, focusing on urban markets (as opposed to suburban markets), and of course, offering endless appetizers on a permanent basis. They hope that can make them stand out from the crowd.


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Butterfinger backlash?

As companies work to drive sales of struggling brands, sometimes revamped recipes result in backlash from loyal customers.

Toblerone felt the wrath of shoppers when it changed its iconic triangular shape in the UK to avoid raising prices in 2016. Butterfinger's sister brand Nutella faced boycott threats after quietly changing its recipe in 2017. And, while Reese's has not even rolled out its new Reese's Thins yet, customers reacted furiously to the mere idea of having less peanut butter in their chocolate cups.

Mandel said that tests of the new Butterfinger have reinforced the company's conviction that both dedicated fans and new shoppers will embrace the revamped recipe.

"Anytime you change, someone super, super set in their ways may not like it," she said. "But the feedback we've gotten from consumers makes us confident."

In February, Ferrero will launch a massive advertising push to promote the revamped Butterfinger, spending more than double than what the company has spent on the candy's marketing in prior years. According to Mandel, this is the largest investment she's seen in the brand in her 14 years working with Butterfinger and other former Nestlé US candies.

Despite pricier, higher-quality ingredients and the marketing push, Butterfinger's prices will not increase, something even Butterfinger 2.0 skeptics can celebrate.


Watch the video: STARSHIP - MTV New Years Eve Special - 198586 Full Concert (September 2021).