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Mushroom and courgette soup recipe

Mushroom and courgette soup recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Soup
  • Vegetable soup
  • Squash soup
  • Courgette soup

I have been making this soup for years and still enjoy it. It's a very quick and easy fresh mushroom soup. If you like, you can add a splash of cream for a richer finish.


County Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK

35 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 300g chestnut mushrooms, rubbed clean and diced
  • 2 medium courgettes, diced
  • 750ml water
  • 1 1/2 chicken stock cubes
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:15min

  1. Melt the butter in a saucepan and add 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Stir in the diced mushrooms and courgettes; cook gently over medium heat for 5 minutes, or until they are slightly softened and golden in colour.
  2. Pour in the water and add the stock cubes.
  3. Bring to the boil; reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes.
  4. Remove from heat. Use a hand held immersion blender to puree the soup. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  5. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black. Add a splash of cream for a richer finish.

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Green courgette spinach and mushroom soup

I always buy spinach because of the nutritional content and often I don't know what to do with it. This is a great way of using a lot of delectable spinach in one dish.

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INGREDIENTS (4 servings):

  • 2 leeks
  • 240g closed cup mushrooms (or cremini mushrooms)
  • 2 courgettes
  • 150g spinach
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp herbs de Provence
  • 2 tsp minced garlic
  • 1 1/2 stock cubes
  • Salt and pepper to taste if needed

Make cooking easier with my ingredient converter: Click to open

Finely chop up the leeks and mushrooms and sauté in a soup pan in a bit of oil until they soften. Add 600ml of water and all other ingredients apart from the spinach and bring to boil.

Add the spinach 2 min before you finish cooking.

Either pour the soup into a heat-resistant blender or use a hand blender to make a smooth soup.

Serve with some bread and enjoy!

More Vegan Soups, Starters & Sandwiches recipes


Courgette, Mushroom and Feta Bake

Remember those Courgettes that I didn’t get to do anything with?

Turns out they were exactly what I needed for a summer bake dish that I was putting together. Using the same egg and yoghurt topping that I perfected with my Moussaka tribute dish, this bake is bloody yummy eaten hot, but tastes even better served up cold the next day, when the flavours have had time to mingle together. I just love a dish that’s better on day two.

Depending on how quickly you chop veggies, you’ll have this done in about an hour.

To bring out the flavours, it’s best to sweat the courgette and onion, rather than fry them. If you’ve not done it before, it’s really easy, put the olive oil into a large pan and once it is warm (rather than sizzling) add the chopped veg and garlic and leave it on a low/medium heat until the onions are translucent and the courgette is soft (around 5 minutes). A good rule of thumb I use, is that if I can hear the pan sizzling over the noise of my extractor fan, then the temperature is set too high.

Once the courgettes and onions are soft add the mushrooms, parsley and your preferred seasonings – I chose salt, pepper and paprika, but go with whatever you prefer.

Pop the veg into a greased baking dish and mix in the chopped feta cheese. Bake it at 200c for 20 minutes. While that’s baking mix up the yoghurt and eggs with some black pepper.

After 20 minutes, pour the yoghurt topping over the dish and bake for 10 more minutes. Once it is slightly golden on top, you’re good to go.

Parmesan is entirely optional, but does add an extra, very tasty dimension to the dish. I”m not going to tell you how much to use, let’s face it, parmesan is a very personal business, but I grated it all over the top and I don’t regret a thing.

This will serve four with a tasty side salad – tomatoes work perfectly and some bread.

The soft, sweet veg with the saltiness of the feta – this one is a real winner.


I've used a classic British cheese in this mushroom and stilton soup, but I am aware that this cheese is not avaiable in all countries.

Blue stilton is a robust cheese with a strong flavour. It is creamy and unless passed it's best, this cheese should not be particularly acidic. With these characteristics in mind, feel free to substitute alternative blue cheeses for the stilton in this recipe if necessary.

Whichever you view it, this soup ticks all of the flavour boxes. It is robust, hearty and comforting.

Oh, and I decided to add a little mascarpone cheese, just to ensure this Mushroom Thyme & Blue Cheese Soup is luxuriously creamy.

Take a look through my collection of soup recipes for more ideas. The smoky carrot & courgette soup delights my family time after time.


Mushroom and Creme Fraiche Soup

This is yummy soup – very full of fat though, even though it’s vegetarian. So I don’t make it too often but I really enjoy it when I do. If you like a good mix of sharp and creaminess you should love this too.

Another abitmoreveg recipe, this time for a lovely creamy and slightly sour mushroom soup. I really love it but I don’t make it very often because it’s loaded with butter and crème fraîche, which is probably what makes it so tasty… In case you’re wondering, yes you can use plain ordinary field mushrooms in this recipe they work just as well – and cook a little faster than chestnut mushrooms.

I’ve mentioned how good mushrooms are before, they are rich in in iron, are also a source of potassium, selenium, copper, zinc and they are full of fibre. In addition to all this they may help boost your immune system. Many varieties of mushrooms contain beta-glucans. Beta-glucans are sugars that are found in the cell walls of bacteria, fungi (e.g. mushrooms), yeasts, algae, lichens, and plants, such as oats and barley, and it is thought that they may improve the functioning of your immune system.

Garlic is also supposed to be good for your immune system. It is believed that the organo-sulfur compounds in garlic are what gives it its healing properties. Crushing garlic releases an enzyme called alliinase. Alliinase then leads to the formation of allicin which is an organo-sulfur compound. Heating can reduce the amount of allicin in garlic but apparently if you leave the garlic be for 10 minutes after crushing it the enzyme will have done its work and so you will still get a decent amount of organo-sulfur goodness in your cooked dish. You can find a bit more information on this here.

I add a good bit of butter and crème fraîche to this mushroom soup. It seems that a lot of people have positive things to say about butter. I maybe visited the wrong sites when looking up the health benefits of crème fraîche as most websites said that it should only be consumed in moderation. I think that anything with saturated fat should be consumed in moderation. Both butter and crème fraîche are high in saturated fat but they also add a lot of taste and flavour to a dish – and that can’t be so bad, provided it’s natural and part of a balanced diet, right?

If you’re not a fan of crème fraîche or mustard, replace them both with 50 – 75ml of double cream.


Courgette and leek soup

This is a soup my mum always used to make. I twisted the ingredients a bit and made it my own. It's super delicious and warming, perfect for an autumn day.

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INGREDIENTS:

Soup ingredients:

  • 1 large courgette
  • 2 leeks
  • 1 1/2 stock cubes
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 3/4l water
  • Black pepper to taste
  • 1 large garlic or 1 small tsp garlic powder

Garnish ingredients:

  • A handful of cooked chickpeas
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • Garlic powder
  • Curry powder, or turmeric - all of them go well with the soup and give it a nice twist)
  • Soy yoghurt, soy double cream or cashew creme (see recipe here)

Make cooking easier with my ingredient converter: Click to open

Cut the leeks into small rings and then sauté in a pan with some olive oil until they are soft (this is important for the leek to develop it's full flavour). In the meantime finely chop up the courgettes. Add both the fried leek and courgette into a pot with 3/4l boiling water and add the rest of the soup ingredients and cook for about 20 minutes (you might have to add a bit more water). Once cooked, blend with a hand blender, do a taste test and add a bit more salt if necessary.

For the garnish, season a handful of chickpeas with salt, pepper, garlic powder and curry powder and sauté in oil until crisp (you might have to turn down the heat a bit as chickpeas tend to behave like pop corn when fried at high heat and could jump at you).

Serve the soup with the fried chickpeas placed in middle with a some soy yoghurt, soy double cream or cashew creme (find the recipe here) for extra flavour.


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Autumn

I love late summer andthe beginning of autumn. I love the change in light on sunny days, the gentle breeze and hint of cooler days. Most of all I love the changing colours and the falling leaves. The smell as they begin to rot and give their goodness back to the earth.

I love the Autumn trees, the wonderful colours. The chill air brings promise of warming soups, made with late summer vegetables such as marrow and courgettes

September always makes me think of new beginnings. I think it is left over from starting the new year at school and college. Perhaps it is also because it is harder to get things achieved in the summer as so many people are on holiday and the autumn brings a feeling of getting back in doors and getting some hard work done!

Autumn heralds the late summer vegetables and the promise of winter root vegetables – parsnip and swede. As the days get colder, warming stews and soups take over from salads and light suppers.


Portobello Mushroom Soup Recipe with Blue Cheese Toasties

50g butter
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 onion, finely chopped
1 Tbsp fresh thyme
500g portobello mushrooms, sliced - plus 2 whole mushrooms to garnish
½ cup cream
1 pinch chives, to garnish
Salt and pepper to season
½ cup white wine
1 tsp lemon zest
1 cup vegetable stock
200g blue cheese
8 slices multigrain bread
Olive oil, to brush

1. Melt the butter with the thyme leaves and onion in a heavy based soup pot. Add two of the mushrooms, cover and cook gently for 2 minutes, remove and reserve for the garnish.

2. Add the rest of the mushrooms, wine, zest, stock and cream.

3. Simmer for 20 minutes then puree. Season.

4. Keep the soup warm while making the toast.

5. Spread the slices of bread with the cheese then brush with olive oil and grill until crisp. Serve soup garnished with mushrooms and chives.


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