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10 Truly Organic Brands Slideshow

10 Truly Organic Brands Slideshow


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Health Valley

There is no actual Health Valley. But if there was it might be located in Boulder, Colo., where the company is headquartered. Though the Hain Celestial Group owns it, Health Valley’s products are certified organic. Among their more creative offerings are fortified toaster tarts. Who knew Pop Tarts could be healthy?

Applegate Farms

What if you weren’t afraid to know where your hot dog ingredients came from? That question provided the inspiration for Applegate Farms' founder and owner Stephen McDonnell to start his company. Today, it remains true to its roots. For proof, they’ve created an illustrated handout titled Fifteen Things You Can Tell Your Mother About Applegate that highlights how McDonnell and crew have kept to their original mission as the company has grown.

Green & Black's

Like others on this list, Green & Black’s started small and eventually was purchased by a large corporation (Cadbury in this case). Since then they have stayed organic by using cocoa beans (one of the world's most highly sprayed food crops) that are farmed without pesticides.

Purity.Organic

Purity.Organic has a simple formula: “Well supported organic farmers = superior fruit = the best tasting juice and functional drinks = happy people!” This San Francisco-based company works directly with farmers to cut out the middleman. As a result, they return 10 percent of their dividends to the organic community and give the consumer a better price.

Cascadian Farms

In 1972, Cascadian Farms' founder Gene Kahn set out to farm the land next to the Skagit River in the Cascade Mountains of Washington. The farm has grown dramatically beyond Kahn’s original one-man hobby (it is now owned by General Mills), yet the 28-acre spread remains tucked away in the Upper Skagit Valley.

Stoneyfield Farms

Before its products were found in every supermarket dairy aisle, Stoneyfield Farms started as a nonprofit school that taught sustainable farming methods. Today, they buy milk from the Organic Valley/CROPP dairy cooperative of more than 1,300 family farms throughout the U.S., ensuring that the giant agribusinesses don’t overtake our country’s farmland.

Flying Pigs Farm

Husband and wife Michael Yezzi and Jennifer Small operate their small-scale farm in rural Shushan, N.Y. Throughout the week, they make multiple trips to Manhattan to sell their rare, heritage breed pigs at the Union Square Green Market and to restaurants like Gramercy Tavern, Jean-Georges, and Telepan. The meat is not inexpensive, but that’s the trade-off of their humane and sustainable breeding and butchering practices.

Milk Thistle Farm

This family-run dairy in the Hudson Valley produces creamy milk served the old-fashioned way, in glass bottles. At Milk Thistle Farm, they never use chemical fertilizers, synthetic hormones, or antibiotics. Their lightly pasteurized milk has a huge fan in David Chang, who showcases it at Momofuku Milk Bar.

Organic Valley

When Organic Valley opened in 1998, there were no government-sanctioned definitions of organic. So they created their own standards, which they still use to this day because they believe they go above and beyond the rules of the USDA. To date, 1,634 farmer-owners make up the co-op.

Horizon Organic

The cute flying cow is reason enough to pick up a carton of their milk, but know that there is more to Horizon than colorful packing. (Ignore the beer.) The ingredients for their milk, cheese, yogurt, and butter come from more than 600 independent farms around the country.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.


The 26 Best Natural & Organic Makeup Brands on the Market

As many of us become more conscious of what we're putting in our bodies and what we're putting our bodies through, we're also becoming more aware of what we're putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them without even realizing they're all-natural.

But before we get into our favorites, let's get one thing straight: "Natural" doesn't automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product ("natural" isn't regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). "There is no real definition of 'natural' in the U.S. beauty industry," says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. "As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say 'natural-based.' There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics."

The FDA does not have a definition for the term "organic," either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which it uses as guidelines. "'Organic' usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green," King says.

"ɼlean beauty' is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective," says King. "'Non-toxic' means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming 'natural' or 'organic' as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials."

This brings us to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn't mean that there's no chance you'll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it's important to be aware of what you're using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we're definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase "clean beauty." In 2018, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company's new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora's ingredient guidelines are deemed "clean" and receive the retailer's Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it's never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there's a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it's never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But we also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.