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Pizza GoodFood

Pizza GoodFood

Prepare the dough: in a bowl put the sifted flour, cornmeal, salt, olive oil and yeast dissolved in 40 ml of lukewarm water from the 140 ml. Mix everything. The result is a soft dough that is set aside for 15 minutes.

After this time, knead for 2 minutes on a table greased with a little oil. Put it to rest again for 10 minutes, then knead it once more and leave it again for 15 minutes.

The dough is spread this time on the table sprinkled with flour in a suitable thin sheet. Place in a pizza tray greased with very little olive oil. Grease the dough with a little oil, add the tomato sauce, then spread the beaten egg as an omelet, sausage, corn, pitted olives and cheese.

Bake in the preheated oven for about 12…. Maximum 15 minutes.

Good appetite!


Casseroles are one of the ultimate American comfort foods, and one of the best casserole recipes you can make from Texas has a nice added zing. Named for the massive King Ranch in Texas, which is larger than the state of Rhode Island, this casserole includes plenty of cheese, tortillas and shredded chicken as well as cans of soup to make it nice and creamy.


Picnic recipes

Al picnic food and drink for sunny days, including pastry, Scotch eggs, cakes, bakes and salads. These easy recipes are sure to please a crowd.

Crispy chicken & # 038 smashed avocado baps

Pack these healthy chicken, avocado and lettuce sandwiches to enjoy on a family summer picnic. The chicken has a crispy coating made from flour, almonds and sesame seeds

Salmon picnic platter

A combination of cooked and smoked salmon, hot-smoked salmon, stuffed eggs and cucumber, yogurt and dill salad makes the ideal al fresco sharer for friends

Egg & # 038 cress club sandwich

Enjoy these toasted egg and cress club sandwiches as part of a summer family picnic. Skewer each sandwich with a sandwich pick and serve with crisps

Caramelized onion & thyme sausage rolls

Take a sheet of puff pastry and stuff it with pork sausages, chutney and mustard to make these onion & thyme sausage rolls. They’re perfect picnic food

Coronation chicken pie

Serve this gently spiced chicken pie warm or cold - it’s delicious either way. While it looks impressive for a party or picnic, it’s easy to make using ready-made puff pastry

Vegan sausage rolls

Pack a picnic, or deck out a buffet table with these moreish vegan sausage rolls, made with mushrooms, brown rice miso, mustard and sage

Piccalilli potato salad

Combine piccalilli with potatoes, cucumbers and radishes, then top with deep-fried onions. It’s ideal as a picnic salad or side dish - just toss with the dressing when you’re ready to eat


Ramadan, roving farmer’s market, apartheid food, pizza

Shoppers at a Melrose event in March, Prosperity Market was born out of the pandemic by Carmen Dianne and Kara Still. Photo by Alex Solomon.

It’s the second week of the holy month of Ramadan, when Muslims around the world gather together to fast and reflect. Chef Anas Atassi shares ways he is breaking the fast. SÜPRMARKT founder Olympia Auset discusses the dearth of healthy food options in South LA. Carmen Dianne and Kara Still were catalyzed by the pandemic to create Prosperity Market, a roving farmer’s market to uplift Black businesses. Stacy Michelson creates whimsical drawings to inspire people to eat and shop well. Bita Rabhan shares the story of her family’s immigration and their bakery takeover this week’s “In the Weeds.” Finally, LA Times restaurant critic Bill Addison delivers his recommendations for LA pizza.


Overturned cake with caramelized oranges

  • Another recipe inspired by GoodFood, whose pages I admire, on the one hand for the content and on the other for the aesthetics of the graphics. Clear photos, minimalist but elegant decors, very pleasant textures, from linen braids to wood. A pleasure to browse the magazine and impossible after going through it to not already have a list ready with what you want to cook in the next period.

I chose one evening to prepare this cake with oranges. Pandispan deserves all the praise, I plan to use it in other combinations of pandispan cakes, very tasty, very fluffy, it grows because you are afraid of not seeing it. One bathroom I would say has this cake, namely the fact that the oranges must be very well cleaned from the skin, which, no matter how hard I tried to complete it, I could not "perfect" it. And the trouble is that this skin (bitter in fact), if not removed, becomes even worse when the cake is ready. So, at the first opportunity, I will try to put either mandarins or clementines, at least as an experiment. Until then, this is their recipe (I only changed the baking times and here and there some weights), rewritten in the personal version :):


Peel the oranges and peel them, then cut them into rounds. I used a form with removable walls (diameter 22-23 cm), the bottom of which I covered with baking paper and then I spread the 5 tablespoons of honey. I placed the most beautiful rounds on the bottom of the form, and I cut the rest into small pieces.


History Behind the Style

If you & rsquore wondering why someone would create a pizza that is practically larger than life, then you need to look back at the people and the time when it was first made. Pittsburgh used to be a town full of immigrants from places like southern Italy and Poland, and they spent long hours working in the steel mills. Their hours of hard labor, combined with a better income, meant that they had large appetites and the money to support pizzas that featured enormous piles of cheese on mounds of dough.

Interestingly, there were some pizza shops that stayed open late at night in mid-century Pittsburgh in order to accommodate the working hours of this particular customer & mdash the steel mill worker.

Hopefully we & rsquove made your mouth start watering and your stomach start growingling, which means that you need to stop by Steel City Pizza in Mount Pleasant to order a Pittsburgh-style pizza! We are proud to build good food that represents our hometown of Pittsburgh here in the low country. Come visit us today!


Clickbait restaurants: Ghosting the traditional delivery model

In search of a quick meal after a long day, journalist Emilie Friedlander stumbles upon a pizza joint with a curious origin story. Photo by Shutterstock.

Shortly before Christmas, and in a cooking rut, journalist Emilie Friedlander scrolled through Doordash looking for a new dish or restaurant to whet her appetite. An eye-grabbing entry called “F * cking Good Pizza” made her stop in her tracks.

Her curiosity about a brand she had never heard of before, with a fair amount of hubris and equal amounts of enigma, led her on a wild goose chase with a surprising discovery. Friedlander, an independent journalist and contributing editor at VICE, documented her odyssey in a piece for the latter called “The Mysterious Case of the F * cking Good Pizza, ”And in an episode of the podcast she co-hosts, The Culture Journalist.

Friedlander speaks with “Good Food” about her uncanny journey, clickbait restaurants, and what “F * cking Good Pizza” has in common with former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick.

KCRW: If you type “F * cking Good Pizza” into your web browser, we find that it’s offered across most delivery platforms. Explain how you came upon it.

Emilie Friedlander: “I was looking for something to eat one night when I was tired after work a few days before Christmas, and I was on Doordash scrolling and I see this listing for 'F * cking Good Pizza.' I was surprised, obviously, by the name. And also surprised because I live in Durham, North Carolina currently. It's a small place. I typically keep on top of what restaurants are opening up, and I had never heard of this one before. And I actually texted a friend who works at the local paper editing culture stories and asked if she knew what it was, and she had never heard of it either.

But then I kept on Googling and eventually started finding that there were ‘F * cking Good Pizzas’ not just in Durham, but in many different cities in the United States. I counted dozens of locations, I think 42 in total, some as far as Australia, Malaysia, the United Arab Emirates. And my hunch, since I had been hearing a lot about virtual restaurants during the pandemic, was that maybe this was some kind of virtual restaurant brand. Or some company that was creating ‘F * cking Good Pizza’ and other brands I started to find similar to it, and then was licensing them off to restaurants. ”

You uncovered dozens of these locations. Did you eventually find an address?

“What I found was that a lot of the listings did share an address with a brick and mortar restaurant. But what I did notice was that a lot of them also traced back to buildings that seem to be ghost kitchens, or what people call ‘cloud kitchens’ or ‘shared kitchens.’

And I also found that an unusual number of these different brands, not just ‘F * cking Good Pizza’ but others like it, were tracing back to a building in Los Angeles, actually 1842 West Washington Boulevard. And that address, it turns out, was listed as the primary address of a company called Cloud Kitchens, which is owned or run primarily by Uber co-founder and former CEO Travis Kalanick. ”

So is there a company that it goes back to called City Storage Systems?

“Yeah, City Storage Systems is a company that is the parent company of Cloud Kitchens. You could call it a real estate company, a holding company. It was founded by this man named Diego Berdakin, a Los Angeles investor in numerous startups. And Travis Kalanick, after he was pushed out of Uber, put $ 150 million of his own money from his investment fund into city storage systems.

And out of that came Cloud Kitchens, which advertised itself as a ghost kitchen company. But the way that the company kind of positioned itself or described itself was as a real estate company, a company that buys up distressed real estate all over the United States and renovates it, repurposes it for these shared kitchen spaces, they say for food and retail purposes. ”

If they're all over the globe, how does the business function?

“There are different lines of business within the umbrella of City Storage Systems. The company has different operations it has set up. Cloud Kitchens is the one that people will be most familiar with. Then there is also a company called Otter… that is an order management software. And then Future Foods is another arm of that, which builds up these virtual brands that people, who are either within the Cloud Kitchens network or individual brick and mortar restaurants, can use.

In the case of Future Foods, the way it works for restaurants is the restaurant owner will make contact with the company, or many times people said that Future Foods reached out to them. They talk about the kinds of items they're already selling on their menu. And then they present them with a list of menus and concepts that seem like they might be a good fit for what they're doing.

Like let’s say you’re a pizza restaurant and someone gives you the ‘F * cking Good Pizza’ menu, you look it over and decide which items kind of correspond to the ones you already make. So it’s not making new things. … I call it a ‘skin,’ like an advertising skin you can use to present offerings you would already be making, or very similar offerings in a new way [for] reaching a new audience.

… The food is basically just what you would get if you ordered from that restaurant from their original menu, but packaged in a different way. And therefore it can really vary. ”

There's something so dystopian about all of this - the predatory nature of real estate acquisitions, in terms of going after distressed businesses. And then creating a brand that has so little in common with attributes that we normally perceive as positive in our relationship to food and how we get it. How would you describe this as being different from Uber Eats, Doordash, or any other regular delivery situation? Is it because it's completely vertically integrated?

“These services actually are, in some cases, branching out into the virtual brand space, or branching out into even the shared kitchen space. Uber Eats, for example, has helped thousands of restaurants put together their own virtual brands. But it's a bit different, because they're working directly with the restaurant to see maybe what is something in the area that isn't being sold, or that is maybe fitting with what they already do that they could come up with. And it felt a little bit more natural. It would be like a one-off custom virtual restaurant you create yourself.

But this is not like that. This is taking these generic concepts and applying them to restaurants anywhere. Something that came up in my reading on the topic is that, especially [with] immigrant owned restaurants who are taking on these concepts, for example, there’s multiple Thai concepts within the Future Foods portfolio, and they suggest a sort of generic Thai cuisine that is not taking into account cultural variation, the specific way that the food is prepared.

And so if you imagine this continuing and becoming a more and more popular practice, especially on these terms, I do think that this particular iteration of virtual brands is unusually dystopian. But you can imagine a sort of cultural erasure from restaurant scenes if this were to become more ubiquitous. ”

How many concepts are there within the future foods umbrella?

"They advertise that they have over 200."

And was there a consensus among business owners that you spoke with about continuing to use Future Foods once they're able to reopen?

“Many of them had said that this had helped them a lot during the pandemic. In some cases, they said, ‘Oh, we were able to not lay off our staff because we did this,’ or ‘It saved our restaurant from closure.’ However, I got the sense that most of them would probably continue only as as long as they needed to, and maybe in some cases, might actually take the lessons they learned from working with Future Foods and apply it to making their own virtual restaurant brands that they could design themselves. Which I think is maybe a healthier activity than working with this large company that also has, through Otter, insight into their data on who is buying what and all that. ”

It strikes me as almost like the restaurant equivalent of a payday loan, because no restaurateur is actually making money paying out such a huge percentage in fees. And yet, you need cash to cover your expenses. And so you get into this circular situation of debt, and yet wanting those orders.

“I think that overall, the feeling I came away with after reporting the story was just such a heavy feeling of stress and anxiety around how technology had already been transforming the industry. And the sense of, ‘We’re doing this and working with these virtual brands because we don’t have another choice. We are already being really hit hard by the high delivery fees. And we have to keep orders going out the door at all costs. ’And that this was less something that they viewed as an exciting thing.

Maybe in some cases they viewed it as exciting, but more of a Band-Aid solution to ‘Well, we have to get more orders and what are we going to do? Okay, these people who come from a technology background are telling us that they can make this problem go away or help us to cut through the noise online. ’”

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1. Combine the capsicum, tomato, onion, garlic, lamb, tomato paste, spices, salt, olive oil and parsley together in a large bowl and mix until well combined. Allow to marinate for at least 10 minutes, but preferably an hour or more.

2. Heat your oven to 220C fan-forced (240C conventional). Divide the meat mixture evenly between the bases. Spread over one pizza base in a thin layer reaching almost to the edge. Drizzle with olive oil. Repeat for the remaining pizza bases.

3. Place the lahmacun on pizza trays lined with baking paper and bake for 10 minutes until the base is crisp. Serve with the lemon wedges, hummus and olives.

Find more of Adam Liaw's recipes in the Good Food New Classics cookbook.


Preheat the oven to 220C / 200C Fan / Gas 7 and put two baking trays in to heat.

To make the sauce, put the tomatoes, mixed herbs and sugar in a saucepan. Peel and finely grate the garlic, add it to the pan and set over a medium heat. Simmer gently for 10 minutes until thickened then remove from the heat and season with salt and pepper. Leave to cool.

To make the dough, combine the flour, baking powder and salt in a bowl and make a well in the middle. Pour in the yoghurt the stir with a fork to combine. When the mixture forms a rough dough, turn out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead to form a smooth ball. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces and roll out into thin circles.

Carefully remove the hot baking trays from the oven and lay the pizza bases on top. Bake for 3-4 minutes until beginning to rise then remove from the oven.

Turn the pizza bases over and top with the sauce. Scatter the mozzarella over the top. Season with black pepper, sprinkle over a pinch of herbs then return to the oven. Bake for 5 minutes until the bases are crisp and the cheese is bubbling.


Gino's East Pizza Recipe

I bet you can’t guess what is rising in my oven right now. I got home a little early today and put the dough together. If you look at the remnants of my original recipe, you will see all of this nonsense of making a slurry with the corn meal etc. I figured out that it doesn't really matter.

Think about it. If you are Gino's East, you want to be able to make pizza really really cheap. It also has to be so easy to make that any idiot off the street can make it for you. My old recipe was way too complicated and would be WAY too expensive to make on a large scale, so it can't be the way Gino's does it. The most distinctive thing about Gino's crust is that it is bright yellow. My problem is that I was trying to get that yellow color using corn meal, and the more corn meal I added, the more difficult it was to keep the crust from getting grainy.

I actually came to the answer to the yellow crust by way of Cuba and India. Let me explain. I was trying to make tandoori chicken for years. I could get it to taste right but I couldn't get it to turn bright red, no matter what combination of spices I used. I looked at lots of Indian cookbooks, but it wasn't until a lot later that I found a cookbook with the secret in it. Then I took a trip to Key West and at a laundromat. I got a Cuban sandwich with yellow rice and black beans. I loved it and immediately tried to figure out how they made the yellow rice, not thinking that it would translate into a Gino's pizza crust eventually. I bought the book Cuban Home Cooking from a gift shop in Key Largo. As it turns out, yellow rice was probably based on the Spanish recipe Saffron rice. But saffron is damned expensive. To make yellow rice in Cuba, they use a powder with a couple spices and yellow food coloring! I went to a Cuban grocery store in Miami and bought 6 bottles of Badia Amarillo Yellow Coloring. Its funny because I have six bottles of it. I make yellow rice all the time and I haven't even used a tablespoon of it yet. So anyway that solved 2 problems. I figured out that Tandoori chicken is red because its got red food coloring in it, and Gino's East pizza crust is yellow because its got yellow food coloring in it. Problem solved.

A few other secrets are that they use the cheapest possible flour - H & ampR (hotel and restaraunt) flour. They get the dough made at an outside supplier and it arrives, refrigerated, in big containers, early in the morning. The dough waits all day to be made into pizzas. That explains why if you get a pizza there late in the evening the crust almost has the flavor of beer. It has risen so long that it begins to ferment.

Gino's East Pizza Crust Recipe

1 cup of warm water
1 package yeast
1/2 cup cornmeal or corn flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 T corn oil
2 ½ to 3 cups of cheap generic flour
Yellow food coloring - the real secret to why its yellow.

Take the water and put it in your mixer. add yeast and a touch of sugar. Let the yeast foam up to be sure that it is active. Then add the rest of the ingredients including 2 1/2 cups flour. I usually end up adding between 1/4 and 1/2 teaspoons of yellow food coloring. Using a dough hook, kneed the dough until it is well combined. If the dough is sticky add a little more flour. The dough should be moist but not sticky. Let the mixer kneed the dough for 10 minutes. Put it in the oven to rise. If you desire a late in the day pizza taste (beer like), then let it rise all day.

Assembling the pizza -
Preheat oven to 350. After the dough has risen take your deep dish pizza pan (or a round cake pan with straight sides) and coat the inside of it with a very healthy coating of melted butter. Roll the dough out to about 1/4 inch thick and up it in the pan. Then pinch the dough up along the sides of the pan. Now put your cheese, and I mean a lot, into the crust. Then add your pepperoni, and finally your sauce. Bake in the oven until the crust is starting to brown and cheese is starting to bubble up through the sauce. The little edges of the pepperoni should also be starting to crisp.

And thats about it. I hope everyone is watching the debates tonight, an informed public is best.

Here is a video of the whole process. I've changed the recipe and methods just slightly so don't be alarmed.


Video: How to Stretching a Pizza with the Master Pizzaiolo Massimo Nocerino (September 2021).