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Soy Sauce Overdose Puts Teen in Coma

Soy Sauce Overdose Puts Teen in Coma

Drinking a quart of soy sauce on a dare nearly killed a teenager

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The world needs a public service campaign to discourage kids from eating or drinking things on dares. It almost never ends well, and sometimes it can have extremely dangerous or life-threatening results.

A teenager in Virginia recently drank an entire quart of soy sauce on a dare, and the excess of salt in his body put him in a coma and nearly killed him.

An excess of salt in the blood — a condition called hypernatremia — is dangerous because the salt sucks water out of the brain and body tissues and into the blood, which causes the brain to shrink and bleed.

The boy’s friends took him to the emergency room when he started having seizures, and doctors flooded his body with a water and sugar mixture. According to the Huffington Post, after about five hours his sodium levels returned to normal, but he remained in a coma for three days.

For several days after he woke up, he was still showing residual effects on his brain from the seizures. But after a month doctors said he made a full recovery.

According to the doctors who treated him, his was the first known case of a person deliberately overdosing on that much salt and surviving with no lasting neurological problems.


Animal studies have found 3-MCPD to be a toxic substance. It was found to damage the kidneys, decrease fertility and cause tumors (29, 30). Due to these problems, the European Union set a limit of 0.02 mg of 3-MCPD per kg (2.2 lbs) of soy sauce. In the US, the limit is higher at 1 mg per kg (2.2 lbs) (30, 31, 32).

Often considered a hidden source of added sugar and sodium, heavy pours of condiments like soy sauce, ketchup and barbecue sauce can add up to a whole lot of skin distress. Be sure to keep your portions in moderation.


Man dared to drink quart of soy sauce almost dies from salt poisoning

A young man who drank a quart of soy sauce went into a coma and nearly died from an excess of salt in his body, according to a recent case report.

The 19-year-old, who drank the soy sauce after being dared by friends, is the first person known to have deliberately overdosed on such a high amount of salt and survived with no lasting neurological problems, according to the doctors in Virginia who reported his case. The case report was published online June 4 in the Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Too much salt in the blood, a condition called hypernatremia, is usually seen in people with psychiatric conditions who develop a strong appetite for the condiment, said Dr. David J. Carlberg, who treated the young man and works as an emergency medicine physician at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Hypernatremia is dangerous because it causes the brain to lose water. When there is too much saltin the bloodstream, water moves out of the body tissues and into the blood by the process of osmosis, to try to equalize the salt concentration between the two. As water the leaves the brain, the organ can shrink and bleed, Carlberg said.

After the man drank the soy sauce, he began twitching and having seizures, and the friends took him to an emergency room. That hospital administered anti-seizure medication, and he was already in a coma when he was taken to the hospital where Carlberg was working, the University of Virginia Medical Center, nearly four hours after the event.

"He didn't respond to any of the stimuli that we gave him," Carlberg said. "He had some clonus, which is just elevated reflexes. It's a sign that basically the nervous system wasn't working very well."

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The team immediately began flushing the salt out of his system by administering a solution of water and the sugar dextrose through a nasal tube. When they placed the tube, streaks of brown material came out. Within a half hour, they pumped 1.5 gallons (6 liters) of sugar water into the man's body.

The man's sodium levels returned to normal after about five hours. He remained in a coma for three days, but woke up on his own.

For several days afterward, a part of his brain called the hippocampus showed residual effects from the seizures. But a month after the event, he showed no sign of the overdose: He was back at college, and doing well on his exams, doctors reported.

A typical quart of soy sauce has more than 0.35 pounds (0.16 kilograms) of salt, the researchers said.

Most cases of sodium overdose happen more gradually. In the 1960s and 1970s, doctors actually gave salt to patients suffering from poisoning, to initiate vomiting, until they realized its harmful effects.

Though it's rare in the United States, consuming excess salt was a traditional method for suicide in ancient China, according to the case report.

Carlberg said he believes the young man survived because the team got his sodium levels down so quickly.

"We were more aggressive than had been reported before in terms of bringing his sodium back down to a safer range," Carlberg told LiveScience. Reducing sodium levels more slowly has had poor or mixed results in the past, he said.

Copyright 2013 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Man Nearly Dies After Soy Sauce Overdose

By Patrick Hickey Jr. &bull Published June 10, 2013 &bull Updated on June 11, 2013 at 11:41 am

A 19-year-old went into a coma and nearly died after he drank more than a quart of soy sauce, a case study published in the Journal of Emergency Medicine on June 4 said.

The teen reportedly drank the condiment after he was dared by his friends. According to the doctors in Virginia who conducted emergency treatment, the teen is is the first person known to have deliberately overdosed on such a high amount of salt and survived, with no lasting neurological problems.

After he drank the soy sauce, the man began having seizures and was rushed to the ER. Once there, doctors administered anti-seizure medication, but the man was already in a coma. After the medical staff flushed his system of soy sauce, they replaced it with a water and sugar dextrose solution.

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"He didn't respond to any of the stimuli that we gave him," Dr. David J. Carlberg, who treated the victim, told LiveScience.com. "He had some clonus, which is just elevated reflexes. It's a sign that basically the nervous system wasn't working very well."

After five hours of treatment, the man's sodium levels returned to normal. Three days later he woke from his coma. A month after the accident, he returned to college and showed no effects of the accident.


789 How to eat well in 2021

Speech Materals

This year will be marked as a year of continued uncertainty, anxiety and — if you’re like many people — a lot of stress-related eating.

There is no need to stress about stress eating, though. As most of us await the arrival of new vaccines and the hope for a more healthful way of living, here are some tips to get a jump-start on fueling your body to feel better in 2021.

1. Eat more mindfully and listen to what your body is telling you it wants.
2. Focus on filling your plate with foods that contain important healing nutrients that can help to keep you healthy.
3. Eat more “processed” foods, not ultra processed foods like sausages and packaged desserts — but nutritious frozen and canned foods.
4. Experiment with new recipes
5. Plantify your dishes.
6. Choose fiber and protein-rich snacks.
7. Consume more fluids to stay hydrated.
8. Lean on others to help yourself achieve your health goals.

I – Word Understanding
Jump-start – to start or restart (something) rapidly or forcefully
Plantify – to include plants (plant-based food)

II – Have Your Say
1, What are your diet goals for this year? How are you going to achieve it?
a, Which foods (and drinks) do you hope to eliminate from your diet?
b, Which superfoods (immunity boosting foods) do you want to include in your diet?
2, What can you say about food trends? What do you think will be the food trend this year? Let’s take a look at the last 5 years’ food trends in Japan:
a, 2020: Take out gourmet
b, 2019: Tapioca
c, 2018: Mackerel (branded canned mackerel)
d, 2017: Chicken breast (high protein, low fat)
e, 2016: Pakchee (Coriander) cuisine
f, 2015: Onigirazu


About

DISCLAIMER The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided by information only - they do not constitute endorsements of any other sites. Recommended treatments may not be applicable, available, or permissible in Canada or other jurisdictions


Teen who drank nearly a litre of soy sauce survives overdose without brain damage

A university student who went into a coma after drinking a bottle of soy sauce as part of an initiation is the first person known to survive such a massive blast of sodium without brain damage.

That’s according to The Journal of Emergency Medicine, which recently published an article on this severe case of hypernatremia – a condition marked by too much sodium in the bloodstream.

The student, then 19, drank a full quart of soy sauce in a hazing incident at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., where he was a Zeta Psi fraternity pledge in 2011.

Media reports say he was also dared to eat dog food, matzo balls and gefilte fish.

The study’s authors said that to their knowledge, the peak salt concentration in his blood was the highest documented among adults who had survived without “neurologic deficits.”

He arrived at an emergency room “in a comatose state with seizure-like activity” two hours after drinking the soy sauce, according to the article. Reports say he was also foaming at the mouth.

He was treated and released from hospital four days later.

Intentional consumption of dangerous amounts of salt is rare, the authors said, and often fatal.

The fraternity was ordered to shut down for two years after an investigation into the incident.


Soy Sauce Overdose: Teenager Left Unconscious but what Causes It?

Soy sauce overdose is not something that you hear often, however that is exactly what happened to a 19-year-old teenager in 2011 after he swallowed a whole quart of the salty condiment, resulting in an overdose which lasted 5 hours.

The soy sauce overdose report published online June 4 in the Journal of Emergency Medicine, did not reveal the identity of the teenager, but said the high sodium intake caused him to pass out and slip into a coma. The teenager was at a University of Virginia frat party when he was asked to drink the soy sauce as part of his initiation. He obliged and soon afterwards, began foaming at the mouth and convulsing. He was rushed to hospital where he was given a solution of sugar water to balance out the high sodium levels.

The man's sodium levels returned to normal after about five hours. He remained in a coma for three days, but woke up on his own.

According to court documents released around the time of the soy sauce overdose, the teenager reacted tby convulsing and foaming at the mouth and was rushed to the hospital by a frat member.

The soy sauce overdose caused the teenager to suffer from hypernatremia, which is when the blood contains a high concentration of sodium. This can cause water from the brain to fill the bloodstream in order to make everything balanced. As a result, the organ can shrink and bleed out.

Dr. David J. Carlberg treated the teenager by flushing his body out with sugar water which balanced out the high sodium levels.

"He didn't respond to any of the stimuli that we gave him. He had some clonus, which is just elevated reflexes. It's a sign that basically the nervous system wasn't working very well," Dr. Carlberg explained.

He added, "We were more aggressive than had been reported before in terms of bringing his sodium back down to a safer range."


Soy Sauce Overdose

Soy sauce is tasty, but apparently it can also be deadly at high levels. Kids, here's why it's dumb to drink a quart of soy sauce as a dare:

After the man drank the soy sauce, he began twitching and having seizures, and the friends took him to an emergency room. That hospital administered anti-seizure medication, and he was already in a coma when he was taken to the hospital where Carlberg was working, the University of Virginia Medical Center, nearly four hours after the event.

"He didn't respond to any of the stimuli that we gave him," Carlberg said. "He had some clonus, which is just elevated reflexes. It's a sign that basically the nervous system wasn't working very well."

The team immediately began flushing the salt out of his system by administering a solution of water and the sugar dextrose through a nasal tube. When they placed the tube, streaks of brown material came out. Within a half hour, they pumped 1.5 gallons (6 liters) of sugar water into the man's body.

The man's sodium levels returned to normal after about five hours. He remained in a coma for three days, but woke up on his own.


18 True Medical Horror Stories That Almost Seem Too Crazy to Be True

This isn’t your average trip to the doctor’s office! Medical sciences and knowledge is constantly evolving, but even so: some of the following stories have thrown the most trained medical professionals for a loop.

Below are 18 cringe-inducing examples of unique medical mysteries, conditions, and malpractice that will seem more fabricated fiction than truth, but rest assured: everything you're about to read is totally true!

Impaled by a French fry!

Discovery Fit & Health’s I Was Impaled series introduced the story of a man who was impaled by a french fry. An errant fry actually ripped through his esophagus, sending him into shock.

Keep track of your contacts, everyone.

An old woman scheduled for cataract surgery had 27 contact lenses lodged in her right eye. Miraculously, her left eye had nothing wrong whatsoever yet when doctors attempted to anesthetize her right eye, they encountered an initial stack of 17 lenses, followed by 10 more.

To this day, the exact nature of “the toxic lady" remains a mystery.

Gloria Ramirez was admitted to the ER in 1994 while suffering from late-stage cervical cancer. Strangely, hospital workers noted that she was covered in a strange oily sheen and had a garlic-like odor on her breath when she was admitted. As they treated her, multiple hospital workers began experiencing symptoms which included fainting, shortness of breath, and muscle spasms. Five workers were hospitalized themselves, and the hospital was evacuated. Ramirez died shorty after her arrival at the hospital, and an alien autopsy of her body was performed, but the exact cause of the events that evening remain a mystery.

Mid-surgery is a bad time to be forgetful.

A California hospital performed surgery on a man and left a surgical towel inside of him. Unable to process food or function properly, the man returned for testing, fearing cancer. Instead, they discovered the man’s surgeon had left a towel inside of him.

This pain was definitely not his imagination.

Even worse than a surgical towel, Daryoush Mazarei’s surgery ended with a ten-inch long retractor left inside of him. What’s more, when he returned to the hospital after suffering tremendous pain, he was told to seek psychiatric care! Eventually he demanded a CT scan and got the retractor removed.

Meet Ewen MacDonald, the half-hanged man.

Scottish soldier Ewen MacDonald was sentenced to death by hanging in 1754. According to reports of his execution and post-mortem dissection reveals that, after apparently ‘dying,’ his body was taken to be dissected and, when placed on the table, sat up and begged for mercy. One surgeon then hit him with a wooden mallet, killing him for real.

Surgical fires?

Catching on fire mid-surgery isn’t usually a concern patients have, but it happened to Janice McCall in 2009. The 65-year-old died six days after being injured in a flash fire during surgery. The cause of the sudden blaze was not revealed in this case.

British serviceman William went in for a root canal, and his memory went haywire.

After the root canal, William was incapable of remembering new information for longer than 90 minutes at a time. In his mind, every day going forward was that same day of the operation: March 14, 2005. Only memories he’d already made remained. So, he got his tooth fixed, but at a uniquely hefty price.

Fun fact: Chimera exist in real life.

Genetic testing between a woman and her three sons (all of whom she definitively conceived, and gave birth to) revealed that they weren’t her biological children—effectively implying she’d given birth to someone else’s children. Further study revealed the woman was a chimera: a mix of two people (in this case, non-identical twins that fused in the womb)!

What are the odds?

A woman was shot by a stray bullet while laying in her hospital bed. While hospitalized for a routine procedure, a bullet flew through her window, piercing two panes of glass, and hit her. According to reports, the bullet may have traveled up to a mile before striking the unknowing patient! She was taken into surgery and stabilized.

H.H. Holmes, one of America’s most famous serial killers, was a doctor.

H.H. Holmes, the deranged mind behind Illinois' “murder castle," was a licensed doctor. He even sold skeletons and organs from his many victims to medical schools.

This ‘doctor’ went on a destructive streak in the 1900s.

Quack doctor Linda Hazzard was responsible for the deaths of at least 14 people under her care after ‘practicing’ at a sanatorium in Washington, where she promoted fasting as a treatment. As a result, numerous patients starved to death, after which she would steal money and worldly possessions from them. She’d never even gone to medical school, but through a loophole in Washington law, was granted a license to practice medicine in the early 1900s.

This man had rocks on his mind.

A Brazilian man suffered from what doctors thought were intense migraines, until they checked his head. It was then that they discovered calcium deposits forming actual rocks in the back of his brain.

The dangers of soy sauce.

A 19-year old Virginia man went into a three-day coma as a result of a soy sauce overdose. After drinking a full quart of soy sauce, he began foaming at the mouth and convulsing. The young man had experienced a condition called hypernatremia—essentially, too much salt in his blood.

The Chicago Tylenol killings drastically reformed anti-tampering laws.

In 1982, a series of lethal poisonings swept through Chicago. Someone—an unknown culprit to this day—tampered with a number of Tylenol capsules and laced them with potassium cyanide. Seven people, who took Tylenol for everyday ailments, were poisoned and killed from unknowingly ingesting cyanide.

Making surgical history in a risky fashion:

The first-ever ovariotomy was performed by Ephraim McDowell in 1809. 45 year-old Jane Crawford has been misdiagnosed with twins when McDowell offered an alternative explanation for her predicament: an ovarian tumor. McDowell performed the surgery without any anesthetics or antibiotics and removed a 22-pound tumor from Crawford. Luckily, she recovered well from the procedure and lived to the age of 78!

These people did not live and learn.

Members of the Rhode Island Hospital operated on the wrong side of a patient’s brain…three times in one year. In the first instance, a resident forgot to mark off which side of the brain was due for operation. In the second, a doctor neglected to mark which side of the patient’s brain had a blood clot, claiming to remember. The patient, an 86-year-old man, later died. The third incident saw both the chief resident neurosurgeon and a nurse stating which side of the brain was to be operated on (the correct side) pre-surgery, before proceeding to operate on the wrong side.

The world’s largest tumor ever removed from a human:

A 300-pound tumor was removed from a woman’s abdomen in Palo Alto, California. The surgery lasted for 6 hours, and the woman had to lie on her back during the procedure, otherwise, the tumor would have crushed her.