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Fish in a spicy tomatillo sauce recipe

Fish in a spicy tomatillo sauce recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Seafood
  • Fish

A wonderful fish dish, which has the perfect combination of flavours and textures. Basa fillets are pan-seared, then simmered in a spicy tomatillo sauce and served with freshly cooked rice.

33 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 280g long grain white rice
  • 600ml water
  • 3 teaspoons chicken stock granules
  • 450g fresh tomatillos, husks removed
  • 3 jalapeno chillies, cut into large pieces
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 tablespoon salt or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon corn oil
  • 80g chopped onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 675g basa fish fillets
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh coriander
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:30min ›Ready in:50min

  1. Combine the rice, water and stock granules in a saucepan. Bring to the boil, then cover and reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 minutes or until rice is tender and water has been absorbed. Set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large pot, bring about 5cm of water to the boil. Add jalapenos and cook for 5 minutes, then add the tomatillos. Boil for 5 more minutes. Remove the tomatillos with a slotted spoon and transfer to a liquidiser. Add 1 clove of garlic, salt and 1 or 2 jalapenos. Puree until liquid, then taste and blend in more jalapeno as desired. Set aside.
  3. Heat the corn oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the onions and 1 clove of garlic; cook and stir until fragrant. Add the fish fillets and cook for about 2 minutes per side. Pour in the tomatillo sauce and mix in the coriander and lime juice. Simmer for a few minutes or place under a grill until fish flakes easily with a fork.
  4. Serve fish immediately on a bed of rice. Spoon sauce over the top. Enjoy with your favourite ice cold beverage.

Fresh tomatillos

Can be purchased in speciality markets when in season. If unavailable, use tinned tomatillos, which are available in Hispanic/Mexican speciality shops or online, but omit the boiling stage.

Jalapeno chillies

Can be purchased in speciality markets or online. If unavailable, use Scotch bonnet chillies to taste.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(33)

Reviews in English (24)

by Aida

Delicious! I took some to work and everyone liked it, but instead of using tomatillos (don't like them that much), I used regular tomatoes. Thanks for the recipe!-15 Aug 2007

by Marlene

Ironically I had bought basa fillets for the 1st time and some tomatillo and jalapenos. I was looking up a recipe for the fish and found this one. Amazing. My son and I prepared it together. Only thing I did was sprinkle a little lime juice on the fish before I cooked it. It was an excellent recipe.-10 Nov 2006

by Charles

This was a ver simple, but delicious recipe. We had never prepared basa before and the recipe was easy to follow and resulted in a meal that we would serve to guests on the first try.-28 Aug 2005


Tomatillo Sauce

We make a lot of salsa verde in the Madness kitchen. It&rsquos one of Patty&rsquos very favorite salsas, so versatile, so perfect on so many dishes. I wanted something different, however, for another dish I was making. I wanted salsa verde, but NOT quite salsa verde. I needed another component.

Call it an experiment, but I decided to combine my favorite salsa verde recipe with another sauce recipe that I love, a creamy jalapeno sauce, which is a classic Tex-Mex recipe.

The experiment was a BIG SUCCESS. I&rsquom not getting creative here, and I&rsquom just calling it Tomatillo Sauce, and I think it&rsquoll be one you&rsquoll want to add to your recipe collection.

Let&rsquos talk about how we make this tomatillo sauce, shall we?


Easy Tomatillo Sauce

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This savory, slightly tart, and spicy tomatillo sauce is simple and beautifully versatile. Use it to sauce chilaquiles, enchiladas, grilled fish, or otherwise plain old broiled chicken breasts.

Instructions

  1. 1 Bring a large pot of water to a boil and drop in the husked tomatillos. Cook, adjusting the heat so the water remains at a steady simmer, until the tomatillos are tender, about 12 to 15 minutes. Drain and transfer to the blender along with the chiles, cilantro, onion, and garlic. Blend the ingredients to form a slightly rough-textured purée.
  2. 2 Warm the vegetable oil in a large skillet or nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the purée, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon as it comes to a boil. Let it cook until it thickens slightly, about 5 minutes.
  3. 3 Add the broth and salt and bring the tomatillo purée back to a boil. Lower the heat to maintain a steady simmer and cook until the sauce has thickened, about 10 minutes. Taste and season with additional salt if necessary.

Cod & Tomatillo Salsa

Cod is the perfect companion for bold sides and garnishes thanks to its mild flavor. This recipe pairs the fish with a zesty Mexican hash of hearty sweet potato and tender summer squash (you may receive green zucchini, grey zucchini, or yellow squash). We’re topping the hash with a bright, fresh salsa of roasted tomatillos and pickled jalapeño—and, for another layer of flavor, drizzling it all with a cooling lime sour cream.

Please note nutritional information, including ingredients and allergens, may differ from above based on your location. Location-specific nutritional information is available for viewing upon subscribing, or by logging in if you are already a subscriber.

Title
  • 2 Cod Fillets
  • 6 oz Tomatillos
  • 2 cloves Garlic
  • 2 Scallions
  • 1 Lime
  • 1 Summer Squash
  • 1 Sweet Potato
  • 1 bunch Cilantro
  • 2 Tbsps Roasted Pepitas
  • 1 oz Sliced Pickled Jalapeño Pepper
  • ½ cup Sour Cream

Preheat the oven to 475°F. Remove and discard any husks from the tomatillos. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Medium dice the sweet potato. Medium dice the squash. Peel and roughly chop the garlic. Roughly chop the cilantro leaves and stems. Quarter the lime. Cut off and discard the root ends of the scallions thinly slice, separating the white bottoms and green tops. In a bowl, combine the sour cream, the juice of 2 lime wedges, the green tops of the scallions, 1 tablespoon of water, and a drizzle of olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Roughly chop the pepper. Thoroughly wash your hands, knife, and cutting board immediately after handling the pepper.

Line a sheet pan with aluminum foil. Place the tomatillos on the prepared sheet pan. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Turn to thoroughly coat. Roast 12 to 14 minutes, or until lightly browned and softened. Remove from the oven. Carefully transfer to a cutting board.

While the tomatillos roast, in a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the sweet potato in a single, even layer cook, without stirring, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Season with salt and pepper. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until browned and slightly softened. Add the squash and cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add the garlic and white bottoms of the scallions. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until slightly softened and fragrant. Turn off the heat. Stir in the pepitas. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide between 2 dishes and set aside in a warm place. Wipe out the pan.

Pat the cod fillets dry with paper towels season with salt and pepper on both sides. In the same pan, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned fillets and cook 4 to 5 minutes per side, or until lightly browned and cooked through. Turn off the heat.

While the cod cooks, when cool enough to handle, finely chop the roasted tomatillos. Transfer to a medium bowl. Add half the cilantro, the juice of the remaining lime wedges, and as much of the pepper as you’d like, depending on how spicy you’d like the dish to be season with salt and pepper. Stir to thoroughly combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Top the dishes of hash with the cooked cod fillets. Top the hash with the as much of the salsa as you’d like (you may have extra). Garnish with the remaining cilantro. Serve with the lime sour cream on the side. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

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Preheat the oven to 475°F. Remove and discard any husks from the tomatillos. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Medium dice the sweet potato. Medium dice the squash. Peel and roughly chop the garlic. Roughly chop the cilantro leaves and stems. Quarter the lime. Cut off and discard the root ends of the scallions thinly slice, separating the white bottoms and green tops. In a bowl, combine the sour cream, the juice of 2 lime wedges, the green tops of the scallions, 1 tablespoon of water, and a drizzle of olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Roughly chop the pepper. Thoroughly wash your hands, knife, and cutting board immediately after handling the pepper.

Line a sheet pan with aluminum foil. Place the tomatillos on the prepared sheet pan. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Turn to thoroughly coat. Roast 12 to 14 minutes, or until lightly browned and softened. Remove from the oven. Carefully transfer to a cutting board.

While the tomatillos roast, in a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the sweet potato in a single, even layer cook, without stirring, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Season with salt and pepper. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until browned and slightly softened. Add the squash and cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add the garlic and white bottoms of the scallions. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until slightly softened and fragrant. Turn off the heat. Stir in the pepitas. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide between 2 dishes and set aside in a warm place. Wipe out the pan.

Pat the cod fillets dry with paper towels season with salt and pepper on both sides. In the same pan, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned fillets and cook 4 to 5 minutes per side, or until lightly browned and cooked through. Turn off the heat.

While the cod cooks, when cool enough to handle, finely chop the roasted tomatillos. Transfer to a medium bowl. Add half the cilantro, the juice of the remaining lime wedges, and as much of the pepper as you’d like, depending on how spicy you’d like the dish to be season with salt and pepper. Stir to thoroughly combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Top the dishes of hash with the cooked cod fillets. Top the hash with the as much of the salsa as you’d like (you may have extra). Garnish with the remaining cilantro. Serve with the lime sour cream on the side. Enjoy!


This Entry-Level Whole Fish Recipe Made Me Who I Am Today

I love the ceremony of it all. The shiny scales, the actual head, the tender meat, the requirement to own a platter, the interactive picking-around while eating that slows things down a bit. (When did we start eating so fast anyway?)

Reasons that might be keeping you from cooking a whole fish at home: Bones. The actual head. The big, weird shape. The fishy smell that threatens to take over your entire living quarters. It seems hard. It seems mysterious. It seems expensive.

Well, I'm here to tell you: RELAAAAAAX! Did you know the fishy smell can go away? (It’s called incense and an open window.) The bones, yeah, you might be dealing with some of those (more on that later!), but again, it slows you down and makes you appreciate every bite. Regarding size, you get to pick the fish with your own eyes, so just get a small guy, something that you know will fit in a pan you own, like branzino or red snapper—don’t overthink it. The head, well, the head just sits there, judging you! You don’t have to pluck out the eyeballs and eat them like Skittles, but you definitely can. You can tease out the cheek flesh and brag to everyone at the table that it’s the best part, actually. The cost really depends on your store and the type of fish, but it’s still cheaper than steak, so there's that! And mysterious? With this whole fish recipe, it won’t be anymore.

Fried Whole Fish with Tomatillo Sauce. Sounds fancy, no? But it’s from our Simple Issue a few summers ago, which required every recipe to be under five ingredients (not counting salt or cooking fat). It also sounds fried as in "deep-fried," but it’s a shallow fry (and it’s less scary in your Dutch oven versus the called-for cast-iron skillet), and when I had only a cup of oil instead of three, it still totally worked. Fried here = crispy skin all around, fast cook time. The whole fish-frying process takes around 8 minutes. Yep.

You heat oil until it’s shimmering, and then lower the fish in slowly, head first (you’re holding it by the tail.) Maybe the tail is out of the oil, no big deal. It sizzles and fries for four minutes-ish, until the skin on the bottom is browned and crispy. Then get in there, Operation-style, with a fish spatula (aka the only spatula you need) and tongs and slowly turn it to the other side. While you’re standing around, use your time wisely and baste hot oil onto the fish head and tail, which makes sure that those get some love if they're not making direct contact with the oil.

That’s the fish part. You’ll grab it out with the spatula + tongs technique, and put it on a wire rack to stay crispy, sprinkling it with salt. (I honestly think I've skipped that and put it on a cutting board, and everything was just fine.)

Part two is a ridiculously easy, lime-green sauce that doubles as salsa. I make this recipe on its own all the time: tomatillos, cilantro, pickled jalapeños and some of their juice. Blended, done. (I’ve also riffed on it by adding a clove of garlic, and fresh jalapeño instead of pickled for more heat—do you!)

SERVE TIME. If you’re entertaining, serve the fish on a platter of the green sauce alongside a kitchen towel stuffed with warmed tortillas. For my nuclear family, we do side bowls of green sauce so we can spoon it on every bite, or uh, just dip the fish right into it. Everyone will say things like: Such crispy skin! Tender, moist fish! Spicy, bright and zesty sauce! Pass me another tortilla!

You don’t need to know the names for the parts of the fish, but it’s true, cutting into this thing is awkward and messy. Sometimes I don’t have time for ceremony and we hack into it, grabbing chunks of fish flesh, every woman for herself. If you’re serving this to 80-hour workweek dinner guests, watch a few YouTube videos and then slice it all nice. Basically you make a cut between the head and the rest, another cut down the top, and you can do a third down the center, where the spine and THOSE BONES are. You pull up the skin and can spoon the flesh off the spine, taking note of the bones that might be coming with. You can even remove the head, pull the spine out of there entirely, and serve only the cut fillets, which is very restaurant-y of you. This is where the medium of video, with its revenue-generating mid-roll ads, is better than any written description.


Roasted Tomatillo and Árbol Pepper Salsa Recipe

But what about the salsa? This post is supposed to be the salsa, right? Perhaps some of you don’t know that a good taco has to have a good salsa, but this is true. Most taco stands or “Taquerias” offer a great selection of different salsas, Salsa verde, Pico de Gallo salsa and sometimes their own creations. This recipe makes a great Taco salsa or, as we say, “Salsa Taquera”, one that stands alone for its rich and unique spiciness, (translation: “hot”, picante, pica mucho, a lot!). Of course, you can reduce the number of peppers, if you prefer a mild flavor and done deal! Either way, this authentic Mexican salsa is simply delicious!


Pork in Tomatillo Sauce


One of the most common changes to this recipe is the type of peppers used for the sauce. If you go south to the Peninsula of Yucatan, the sauce will include their own chile verde, a very mild pepper that is widely available in that area. In central Mexico or the East Coast it will be the serrano or jalapeño peppers, and in the northern states is where the Chile Verde grows: a long, mildly hot pepper that’s also used in the southern states of the USA and known there as the Anaheim pepper. There is also the sauce that includes Chipotle peppers, they could be the dried form or the canned version, also a very popular combination.

So here’s the recipe, you can decide which peppers to use depending on your taste and what’s available in your area.


  • 1 pound tomatillos, husked and rinsed (about 16 small)
  • 3 fresh hot chiles, such as jalapeño or serrano, stems trimmed
  • 1 small onion, quartered
  • 2 cloves garlic,peeled
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano, preferably Mexican
  • 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Place tomatillos and chiles in a saucepan add water to cover. Bring to a boil and simmer until tomatillos are very tender, about 15 minutes. Drain.

Pulse onion and garlic in a food processor until finely chopped. Add the drained tomatillos and chiles and process until smooth. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the tomatillo mixture and oregano. Cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture darkens and thickens, about 10 minutes. Stir in broth and return to a simmer. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, about 20 minutes. Season with salt and let cool to room temperature.

Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.

Note: Tomatillos are tart, plum-size fruits that look like small, husk-covered green tomatoes. Find them in the produce section near the tomatoes. Remove outer husks and rinse well before using.


Roasted Tomatillo Sauce Author: RebeccaBlackwell Prep Time: 25 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes Total Time: 35 minutes Yield: 3 cups

Description

Tomatillos and poblano peppers are charred under high heat until smoky and tender, then cooked with garlic, cumin and lime for a concentrated, bright and tangy, slightly spicy tomatillo sauce that does triple duty as a sauce, marinade, or salsa verde.

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs tomatillos (about 16-18)
  • 3 poblano peppers (see note)
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 – 2 limes
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the broiler and place a rack about 4-inches from the top of the oven. Cover the bottom of a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  2. Put the poblano peppers on the baking sheet and place them under the broiler. Cook until their skin is almost completely blackened. Use tongs to turn them over and cook until they are blackened on the other side. Remove the pan from the oven and put the peppers on a plate.
  3. While the peppers are under the broiler (don’t forget about them), remove the stems and peel the husks from the tomatillos. Rinse them under water to remove the sticky film between the fruit and the husk. Slice them in half and lay them cut side down on the baking sheet after removing the poblano peppers.
  4. Put the pan of tomatillos under the broiler. Roast until the tomatillos are about 50% covered in black spots. Remove from the oven and let cool for about 10 minutes.
  5. While the tomatillos cool, peel the blackened skin from the poblano peppers and remove the stem and seeds. Put the peppers in a blender and pour in the roasted tomatillos and all the juice that’s collected in the baking dish. Puree.
  6. Put the oil in a large saucepan (the sauce will splatter, so you want to use a large, deep pan). Heat the oil over medium heat until shimmering. Add the minced garlic, cumin, and 1/2 tsp salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, for 1 minute.
  7. Pour the pureed tomatillos and peppers into the pan and bring the sauce to a boil. Cover the pan partially with a lid or a sheet of aluminum foil to prevent splatters and let cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the sauce has thickened slightly and darkened in color.
  8. Remove from the heat and stir in the juice from 1 lime. Taste and add more lime juice, salt or pepper if desired. If using, stir in the chopped cilantro.

Notes

  • No poblano peppers? Leave them out altogether, or see substitution suggestions above the recipe.
  • The sauce can now be used as a marinade, as a flavorful liquid in which to cook chicken, pork, fish, or tender cuts of beef, or as a sauce or salsa, spooned over dishes or served with chips or veggies for dipping.
  • Roasted Tomatillo Sauce will keep in the refrigerator in a covered container for at least 1 week.
  • Tomatillos contain some natural pectin, so the sauce will thicken up a bit more after a couple of hours in the refrigerator.

Keywords: salsa, tomatillo sauce, roasted tomatillos, roasted salsa, salsa verde, simple sauce, easy salsa


Fried Tomatillo and Spicy Mayo Sandwiches Recipe

Salty, spicy, briny, pickled, hot, sour lately all I want to do is eat foods that are intensely savory. Just last night I was saying that everything I had tasted throughout a recent meal needed salt or a hit of acid, readily admitting that if I could drink condiments I would (actually, I had a martini with pickle brine at Kinshop recently which was pretty close to heaven).

This recipe came out of my craving for a sandwich that would pack multiple flavors and textures in a single bite. I use tangy, sour-sweet tomatillos for salsas verdes on a regular basis, but lately have been enjoying them fresh, tossed with Maldon salt, pepper, and chilled watermelon. I thought their fruity acidity would make an interesting contrast with coarse yellow cornmeal, which, when fried, smells just like campfire popcorn.

The crisp, golden cornmeal crust encases the tomatillo, which turns tender and soft during cooking. To add a smoky, crunchy layer to the sandwich, strips of bacon hide underneath the tomatillos. Spicy mayo laced with Asian ingredients like fish sauce and Sriracha add a creamy, bold accent, while peppery radish, vibrant cilantro, and licorice-scented basil contribute a refreshing element that ties everything together.